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Hello,

I have a large piece of highly figured maple that I will use to build the back for an upright bass. The top is straight split spruce that I have split into a bookmatched set and I am looking to do the same for the back. I am looking to build this bass using all hand tools and I am looking for insight regarding the following procedures.

-splitting/resawwing a 16" x 4" x48" quarter of highly figured maple (down the length ie turn it into two 16" x 2" x 48" halves to be joined down the length bookmatched)
-resawwing the ribs. rough cutting 3-4mm veneer that is 12" x 48"

I am very well acquainted with all of the powertools that do these jobs but I am amazed to see 300-400 year old basses that were contruscted before these modern luxuries and would like to build one this way. As it stands the majority of the work is all done by hand but I can't get my head around how they would have done these steps. Was it all mill work? If so, how did they do it? Doesn't this predate the band saw? Would they have had a huge circular blade? I have had success resawing violin and cello ribs by hande with an old disston d-8, any better ideas? How do you cut 16" by hand?

Thanks for your help!
 

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What is it that you are making? At first I thought it was a Bass Violin, but then read that you would be using 2" think wood. That instrument would not use wood that thick would it?

It is going to be very difficult to control anyhand saw that is long enough to cut a board 48" long. Maybe there is some type of jig you could ake.

George
 

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Bass fiddle or upright bass

:blink:

"I have a large piece of highly figured maple that I will use to build the back for an upright bass."

 

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I don't know the answer, but if I was undertaking a project like that, I would either write to living history farms etc in my area and ask if they let people browse their library, and I might jump onto GoogleBooks and search in the 19th century. An amazing amount of old knowledge has been digitized and is free. For example, if this link works here is the result for GoogleBooks 19th century hits on the search string [Lumber] How did the old farmers, lacking milling equipment, resaw larger timbers with control? For straight rips of smaller stuff, search on "Sawyer's Bench"
 

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GeorgeC said:
What is it that you are making? At first I thought it was a Bass Violin, but then read that you would be using 2" think wood. That instrument would not use wood that thick would it? It is going to be very difficult to control anyhand saw that is long enough to cut a board 48" long. Maybe there is some type of jig you could ake. George
Wouldn't you be cutting from the 16" dimension? And isn't a frame saw the "right" tool?
 

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You can make a bow saw like this

With a deeper throat and by sawing in from each end you could rip the plank down it's length:
 

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I saw this a while back. Bob posts some links for where to find parts, too. It is essentially an oversized bow saw called a frame saw, like what woodnthings posted.
 

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Here are a couple of references I used when I made my Frame Saw (Thanks for the link railaw - saved me from trying to find it ;) ).

http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com/why-you-need-a-resaw-frame-saw/

http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/frame_saw.php

I have only used it on old white oak reclaimed from a barn. The biggest problem I have is not having an adequate vise or other way of supporting the material while sawing. It produces a LOT of vibration and stabilizing the wood is key.

There are a lot of different blogs/guides/tutorials on resawing with a frame saw, so let your fingers do some walking and read all you can if you are considering building/using one.

In short, scribe guide lines on all four sides of the piece to be resawn and start sawing so that you can see the line on two edges at once. Don't try to cut all the way through, move from corner to corner all the way around the board to keep your cut true. I usually count my strokes and try to keep them equal as I move around the board.

It will give you a good workout - take your time, don't try to muscle the cut, and take breaks as needed. And believe me you will need break(s).

I've never tried to cut veneer with my saw (or any other), so I can't offer any advise on that process or if my saw/blade is even suitable for that.
 

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I was shown a somewhat functional pit saw by Firemedic. It's a two man operation and the saw used is specialized with teeth that would present a chisel edge to the wood which is what is needed on end grain ripping.

I like to work with hand tools as well but I would draw the line in this application. I would use my band saw. You could disconnect the motor and install some sort of crank or treadle and make a human powered saw out of it. :)

Bret
 

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The problem with me i can't find that kind of blade. I can find blade from bow crosscut saw but it wil just clogg in wood if i try to rip saw it.
 

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In the Logan Cabinet Shoppe video I posted, in the comments, Bob talks about how to make a suitable blade out of 2 inch spring steel.
 

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You asked what he was making earlier

What is it that you are making? At first I thought it was a Bass Violin, but then read that you would be using 2" think wood. That instrument would not use wood that thick would it?

It is going to be very difficult to control anyhand saw that is long enough to cut a board 48" long. Maybe there is some type of jig you could ake.

George
He's making a back for an upright bass fiddle. That's why I posted the You Tube video. The Video show that the front and back are carved from a solid 2" thick piece, bookmatched in the center, a very laborius process by hand. Controlling a handsaw is obviously possible as other have been able to accomplish it. It's the type of saw that is at issue here, that's why I and others have posted the bow saws or frame saws. It won't be easy regardless.

I believe I understood your question as well as the OP's original question. :yes: Any further questions? :blink:
 

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In the Logan Cabinet Shoppe video I posted, in the comments, Bob talks about how to make a suitable blade out of 2 inch spring steel.
At wich time i didn't hear it.He mention roubo on begining. And it's designed for two person so its harder to rippsaw alone.Sorry i find it on comments i search it in video. Let's be honest who can made this tool blade. They have special toother for this.
 

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Azur Jahić;553328 said:
At wich time i didn't hear it.He mention roubo on begining. And it's designed for two person so its harder to rippsaw alone.Sorry i find it on comments i search it in video. Let's be honest who can made this tool blade. They have special toother for this.
Yes it was in the comments.

I can't say that I've made one, but since it is a rip profile you'd just need a saw sharpening file and a saw set tool.
 
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