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I am about to attempt to resaw a 12 inch wide board (which is 80 inches long and 1 and 7/8 inches thick, I have two boards I would like to do this to) into two appromiamtely 3/4 inch think boards. I do not have a band saw, so I am going to try to do this by hand using a Japanese Ryoba Saw. But I have never done this before. So I need a lot of advice- beginning with: am I crazy?
Thank for the help.
 

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Some time ago I saw Roy Underhill (The Woodwrights Shop - PBS) do this with an american handsaw with ripping teeth. What he did wasn't that long, however. One good point he made was to turn the board around and work from the opposite edge occasionally. This helps to keep the saw on line and overcome the tendency of the end of the saw to wander off line.

Just a suggestion: unless you need your finished project to be 80" long, I suggest that you cut your planks to just a bit longer than what the finished lengths need to be and then re-saw them. The shorter lengths will be easier to work with.

Good luck
 

where's my table saw?
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Maybe a whole lot of work, sweat, sore muscles ....?
Saw better be sharp as a cat's claw.
If possibly use a table saw to make kerfs in either edge to keep the blade aligned, but it will be a wider kerf than the Ryoba saw kerf.
Bandsaw is best, chain saw with thin kerf, and a steady hand, table saw and then a hand ripping saw, and last would be a circular saw with side supports and guide clamped on.
 

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Well, suppose it could be done, but I鈥檓 thinkin鈥 there must be a shop somewhere near you with a big bandsaw.

As mentioned, kerfs on either edge would make less to cut and guide the saw.

You didn鈥檛 mention what kind of wood it is. Some species will be easier to saw than others. Also, is it kiln dried? Wood that鈥檚 wet will not clear chips easily and will be more prone to binding the saw blade.
 

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Couldn't you just do a cut on both sides with a table saw and then that would leave you with a good guide to finishing the rest? It would give you a 6 inch head start or more. You could then finish with a regular saw.

Never mind.. I already saw others recommended this :)
 

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A horizontal band mill will do this quickly.
If you are intent on doing it by hand, scribe a line all the way around and then make edge cuts and end cuts so you have a kerf around the full perimeter. Cut with the saw at as shallow an angle as possible so the ripping teeth are taking off long shavings like a hand plane working with the grain rather than a miter plane working across the end grain. The end cut is needed to get this started right. When your cut is halfway through at the end, flip the board and work from the other side. Your cuts will form a V groove coming to a point at the middle of the board. Work back and forth from both sides.
I've cut hard maple logs in half with a chain saw this way. A sharp chain throws out long shavings so fast that clogging the saw is what limits the speed.
I've used the same technique with a hack saw to cut down iron castings a couple of times when I didn't have access to a milling machine. The cut faces ground flat taking off less than 0.020".
 
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