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My vanity wood counter top is damaged by standing water. The finish started to crack, lift, and flake off, so I sanded the area down with 150 grit and then 220 grit sand paper. Then applied two coats of minwax wood finish in jacobean color.

The result is not what I expected.





The color is not dark enough and there is a strip section that does not seem to absorb the stain. What am I doing wrong?

Do I need to use dye stain?

Do I need to strip the area with chemical?

Please Help!
 

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If the top is veneered, you have to be careful with how much sanding you do as you can sand through the veneer. Where you have the strip that doesn't take stain, it's likely that you haven't sanded all the finish off, or that there is a contaminant like a wax present.

As for color, what you picked is not close to the color you want. Make a better choice in the selection of an oil base stain. Look at this chart and see if one looks closer. You may have to mix.

Keep in mind that when you topcoat over the stained area with whatever you use, it may look different.










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Trying to match a spot on a top takes far more tinkering and work than refinishing the entire top. I would just take some paint and varnish remover and strip the entire top. Then as far as sanding, the finer sandpaper you use to sand it the harder it is to make it dark with an oil stain. Without using an aniline dye first I wouldn't sand it finer than 100 grit. If you like Minwax stain I would try the Dark Walnut and if that isn't dark enough you might have to mix some ebony with it. You can't mix tinting color to Minwax stains to alter the color. You can only intermix it or add aniline dye powders to change the color.
 
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