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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a mahogany dressng table for my daughters. As I was shooting a brad to attach a piece of trim I got too close to the edge and the brad blew through the piece I was attaching the trim to leaving a 1" long by 1/8" wide splintered hole or divit along the front of the piece. Does anyone have suggestions as to how I can repair this damage? The piece is still under construction but replacing the damaged front rail would be almost impossible so a repair is the most likely solution.

Thanks in advance,
Mike
 

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Maker of fine Toothpicks
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I am confussed as to where exactly the damage that needs to be repaired is. Is it the main unit that is damaged? The trim that is damaged? or both? Is the sectioned damaged plywood with mahogany veneer or solid wood?
 

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Old School
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I am building a mahogany dressng table for my daughters. As I was shooting a brad to attach a piece of trim I got too close to the edge and the brad blew through the piece I was attaching the trim to leaving a 1" long by 1/8" wide splintered hole or divit along the front of the piece. Does anyone have suggestions as to how I can repair this damage? The piece is still under construction but replacing the damaged front rail would be almost impossible so a repair is the most likely solution.

Thanks in advance,
Mike

I always hated blind dates. A picture would be nice.
 

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If I understand correctly, you've got a hole and the piece that came out. It can be glued back into place, but the glued-in piece may be obvious.

I've fixed such things, or filled in small gaps by getting some glue down in the cracks and then sanding the area to drive sawdust down into the crack. Works real well on things like walnut, etc. Wipe off the excess glue first, but use and old sanding disk anyway, since some glue/sawdust ends up getting dried onto the disc.

(and don't tell anyone I cheat....)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all of the suggestions. I have some questions about some of the suggestions and some answers to some of your questions.

First I have attached a photo of the damage. The damage is on the bottom rail on the front of the dresser where a drawer will be located. The damage occurred when I was attaching the bead to the rail. The dresser is the one Norm built on NYW if you want to get an idea of how it is supposed to look.

What is Famowood, and where can you buy it?

A question for MiConst, what is burning in and how do you do it?

Thanks
Mike
 

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Old School
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Yer not goin' to like this, but just about anything you do will be somewhat noticeable. You could rout out a shallow groove and inlay a solid wood strip in close grain as to what's there. Or if you have room and can make it look appropriate, why not add a decorative moulding all around the front or just along the bottom to cover the oops and maybe compliment the design.
 

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A question for MiConst, what is burning in and how do you do it?
Burning in is done with a lacquer stick and a hot knife. The stick is melted into place and smoother. You can add different color to apply graining. It takes some practice and you would need to use a couple of colored sticks to get the grain and background but it would work. The process is generally done for damage to finished furniture, movers, showrooms etc. If you know a good furniture re finisher I'm sure they would be able to help.
 

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Burning in is done with a lacquer stick and a hot knife. The stick is melted into place and smoother. You can add different color to apply graining. It takes some practice and you would need to use a couple of colored sticks to get the grain and background but it would work. The process is generally done for damage to finished furniture, movers, showrooms etc. If you know a good furniture re finisher I'm sure they would be able to help.

The burn in process uses shellac sticks, that come in different colors, and can be bought individually. They get "burned" by hot knife (by flame) or electric knife. The kits include spatulas, graining tools, and other neat stuff. An alternative is colored fill-sticks, which are like a crayon consistency that gets rubbed in the repair. There are several brands and many colors. Very easy to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you to everyone for your help. looks like I have several options. I think I'll start with the filler or burning and if that doesn't work out I can use cabinetman's suggestion of covering it with some additional or decorative trim. Since it's for my daughter's I may even have a small brass plate engrved with some words of affection and mount it over the damage.

I feel much better now than I did yesterday.

Thanks again to everyone. This is a great forum. Looks like I'll have to hang around on a regular basis to pick up much needed advice.
 

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flatiron
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repair mahogany

you could make a mixture of mahogany dust & hyde glue. this would take stain. may have to take a small brush and brush in some grain lines.
 

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repairing mahogany

You have had some good sugestions and I like the one best about mixing sawdust and glue.This is a good fix for this problem and if you can use glazing stains you should be able to hide it very well during the finishing.
Happy new year
 

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HALL OF FAMER
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you could make a mixture of mahogany dust & hyde glue. this would take stain. may have to take a small brush and brush in some grain lines.
There will be those who will disagree with me on this, but instead of mixing the glue and dust, I have had success (depending on the size of the damage) with applying the glue to the damaged area and then using an orbital sander over the wet glue. The dust mixes with the glue and creates a "filler". The colour of the "filler" is the same because it came from the same area of wood. It will ruin your sanding disc, but sand paper discs are cheap. Pride in your work, comes at a price. (usually the same cost as a sand paper disk and some glue :laughing:)
Ken
 

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flatiron
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the orbital sander works great. I mix glue and sawdust to patch dovetails,or cracks or ?? it will burnish it in and leave a clean look.
 

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I would finish the project BEFORE any repairs. Famowood and others will leave a residue that will be difficult to hide once it penetrates the wood fibers. The 'burn-in' stick method should be done after the color is finalized. Don't try to anticipate the finished color and fill the hole with a burn-in stick.
After it's finished, you can do some good camoflage tricks like painting in wood grain that should make it almost invisible.
Good luck.
 
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