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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received a broken bedframe from my grandparents. They were wood boards glued and screwed to the side rails which supported the slats running horizontal cross the frame. The boards were ripped off which is what is causing the repair. The original boards are 1“ x 1.5“ so it’s been hard finding a perfect replacement. I found some small oak boards at Home Depot which are 0.75“ x 1.5“. Is it OK to use those smaller boards to support the slats? Also when repairing the side rails I chiseled off any raised areas of wood and filled the holes with wood filler and sanded flat. Was that an acceptable repair method or should other stuff be done?
 

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welcome to the forum, Cardinal.
can you please post some photos of your project ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hopefully these help. I have not sanded down the side rail yet. The black, small board is the old one in the unpainted one it is what I will be replacing it with
 

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It appears you are patching the area with a wood filler? You will NOT get an acceptable repair with an adhesive atop filler. Once sanded smooth you can bolt the replacement board on, but honestly, I would rebuild the bed rails completely - gut reaction is your repair will be temporary at best.

You might be able to raise the small strip higher on the rail eg; attach it to the undamaged area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah that is what I was planning. I was going to glue and then screw in the small strip to the rail. I can’t move it higher or I risk covering the pocket holes to attach to the headboard and footboard. I might look into rebuilding it but not sure if I have all the necessary tools. I was mainly concerned if the switch from a 1” tall strip to 0.75” tall strip would cause structural issues.
 

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If I understand correctly, when you attach the 3/4" x 1 1/2" ledger strip, the 1 1/2" dimension will be horizontal. This will not be ideal for sufficient strength but may work if you glue it properly and insert sufficient screws. I would be inclined to either find a larger board or glue on an additional strip to increase it's width to one or more inches. An easy way to do this would be to lay the ledger strip the other way, with the 1 1/2" dimension against the side rail, and then double it with a second strip of the same or similar size. Glue it and run screws through both. This will provide much more glue area against the side rail and much greater strength. The second strip will provide more area for the slats to lay on.
Without more details, I suspect that the filling and sanding you did will be OK. This is an area that won't be seen anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If I understand correctly, when you attach the 3/4" x 1 1/2" ledger strip, the 1 1/2" dimension will be horizontal. This will not be ideal for sufficient strength but may work if you glue it properly and insert sufficient screws. I would be inclined to either find a larger board or glue on an additional strip to increase it's width to one or more inches. An easy way to do this would be to lay the ledger strip the other way, with the 1 1/2" dimension against the side rail, and then double it with a second strip of the same or similar size. Glue it and run screws through both. This will provide much more glue area against the side rail and much greater strength. The second strip will provide more area for the slats to lay on.
Without more details, I suspect that the filling and sanding you did will be OK. This is an area that won't be seen anyway.
Thank you for your reply. Initially that is what I was considering (glueing the .75” dimension against the side rail) but now that you mention doing twice that is a better idea. Home Depot has a 2x2 (actual 1.5”x1.5”) that would do exactly what you just mentioned without having to glue a second board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is there a best kind of wood for this task? I wanted to use Oak cause I thought that would be stronger but it can get pretty expensive. I’m willing to pay it if it’s the best but just wasn’t sure if poplar, pine, or anything else was better/equal?
 

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Hardwood, of course, would be best for strength. However, if the grain is straight and has no knots and it is properly glued and screwed, something like poplar or pine should be fine. Keep in mind that it is this strip that is holding your butt up.
You didn't ask about it but I'll make one additional point from my experience. Some side rails have a tendency to bow outward and allow the slats to slip off of the ledger. I have found that it is a good idea to screw down at least one slat near the middle to prevent that. One screw in each end is sufficient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hopefully my last question. Home Depot only has 2x2x3 boards and I need 7ft. Is it safe to get 3 and just screw to the side rail individually or should I really try to find a 2x2x8 and cut down?
 

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A single piece will be easier to work with but separate pieces will work. Just make sure that the individual slats are well supported.
 

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It appears you are patching the area with a wood filler? You will NOT get an acceptable repair with an adhesive atop filler. Once sanded smooth you can bolt the replacement board on, but honestly, I would rebuild the bed rails completely - gut reaction is your repair will be temporary at best.

You might be able to raise the small strip higher on the rail eg; attach it to the undamaged area.
We would have stopped you if we only knew!
Glue will only bond adequately to fresh, untreated wood. It will not bond to previous glue or any wood fillers or finishes.
What's your choice now?
Rip away the 3/4' or so with the filler and glue on a new 2" X 3/4 strip. Now you can reattach the ledger for the bed slats to new fresh wood. It would be best to make a new ledger also if there is any remnant of old glue OR just take off 1/16" of material OR flip it around so there's a new fresh edge to glue against the frame board. No finish is allowed on the glued edge. Do the same on both side of the frame so they will match, but you won't see both sides at the same time so it may not matter that much?
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We would have stopped you if we only knew!
Glue will only bond adequately to fresh, untreated wood. It will not bond to previous glue or any wood fillers or finishes.
What's your choice now?
Rip away the 3/4' or so with the filler and glue on a new 2" X 3/4 strip. Now you can reattach the ledger for the bed slats to new fresh wood. It would be best to make a new ledger also if there is any remnant of old glue OR just take off 1/16" of material OR flip it around so there's a new fresh edge to glue against the frame board. No finish is allowed on the glued edge. Do the same on both side of the frame so they will match, but you won't see both sides at the same time so it may not matter that much?
You mention not to glue anything but then you also say how I should glue on a 2x3/4 strip so isn’t that just gluing over filler material?
 

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It's pretty plain English. Do not attempt to glue over putty, filler, old finishes or old glue. Glue will only bond to new, fresh untreated wood and that's why you need to make a new 2" strip across the bottom edge of the bed rail.
 
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I received a broken bedframe from my grandparents. They were wood boards glued and screwed to the side rails which supported the slats running horizontal cross the frame. The boards were ripped off which is what is causing the repair. The original boards are 1“ x 1.5“ so it’s been hard finding a perfect replacement. I found some small oak boards at Home Depot which are 0.75“ x 1.5“. Is it OK to use those smaller boards to support the slats? Also when repairing the side rails I chiseled off any raised areas of wood and filled the holes with wood filler and sanded flat. Was that an acceptable repair method or should other stuff be done?
Not sure if this is to late to be of help, but if you are using hardwood be sure and predrill holes threw it that are slightly larger than the screw shaft diameter so you won't split the wood and to make sure it will pull down tight to the side rails. Also the obvious is to make sure the height from the top of the rail to the top of replacement piece matches the height of the existing rail on the unrepaired side (other side of bed) I would not worry about gluing. If you put enough #8 screws about every 6 to8 inches so they go into the side rail within 1/4" of coming out the other side you should be fine. If the side rail is hardwood you may want to predrill hole with bit that is smaller than the diameter of the screw threads.
 
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