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Hi. I need to repair several divots in the top edge of some baseboard. Looks to be made out of particle board (painted). Seems like probably a simple fix, but since I've never done this before...was just curious what method you would recommend for fixing it? I've read you can fill with pretty much any number of things before sanding and re-painting (wood putty, drywall spackle, wood epoxy, etc).

Never used epoxy before, but that seems like a good alternative? Would something like QuickWood epoxy be a good choice or is there something else you can recommend?

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=6511&filter=wood epoxy

Thanks for any advice...
 

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It really depends upon the size of the divots. (What were you doing playing golf on your baseboards?)

Everything you listed would work, but spackling is only good for a very small hole, like a nail hole.

Can you give dimensions or post a picture?

Of the things you listed wood puty would probably be best. Epoxy is hard to work and sand in that situation.

You might want consider automotive bondo. It makes a hard finish, can work over a large "divot" and as relatively easy to sand.

George
 

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You might want consider automotive bondo. It makes a hard finish, can work over a large "divot" and as relatively easy to sand.

George
Bondo is the "go to" for most painters.
I've seen amazing repairs done with it.

Tip o the day:
Bondo takes about 15-20 min to set up and become hard.
In the first 5-10 minutes, it is still very soft and cuts like butter.

Take this opportunity to shape it close to your finished profile with a utility knife, chisel or some other forming tool.

This will save you a ton of sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It really depends upon the size of the divots. (What were you doing playing golf on your baseboards?)

LOL, could be...amazing how much damage kids can do.

"Divot" might have been an exaggeration...going from memory, I don't think any of the marks were more than an 1" wide, maybe 1/4" deep.

Thanks for the tip on the bondo, I'll give that a shot.
 

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I recently had to fix some baseboard in my house. There was major tear our and damage from where a screw into the baseboard style door stop used to be.

I saw a lot of people talking about bondo and intended to use that. When I got to lowes they had bondo on one shelf and three shelves up they had water putty. I ended up getting the water putty since it was like 2 bucks. I was willing to see how it did.

I was happy enough with how it turned out. I've since used it in another couple of places. The house I bought was a foreclosure and had some latches drilled into the door frames / moldings. It filled those holes and sanded just fine.
 

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I would use Bondo as it dries fast and is fairly easy to sand. Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty also works good, is less expensive, has a longer (dry) shelf life, but is more difficult to sand, IMO. The Bondo seems to feather out better along the edges.

In using either, I suggest removing any finish in and around the repair before adding the fill.






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bondo is my friend,easy to shape and paint,a must in the cabinet shop.rock hard is just that hard as a rock also most wood putties
shrink,in a small hole thats ok,large depressions?
 
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