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Discussion Starter #1
Our dog decided to rebel recently and scratched and chipped a cabinet in our den.
As you can see, there are a number of deep scratches and some chunks taken out of the corner, that's the part that concerns me the most.

What is the best way to repair, especially the missing pieces?
Once repaired, I plan to refinish the entire piece.

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You might consider hiding the damage by gluing thin strips of wood (overlay) that match the door molding onto the front and sides vertically on each door. The problem I see is matching the patina, unless you are going to paint it.
 

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We had the same experience in the mid 90's with a red oak kitchen [rent house] and a bored puppy. She chewed out a largish sized piece on a lower corner trim section. My wife worked in a $$$$ furniture store and brought home a wide array of finish sticks and such. I rebuilt the missing section with red Bondo [automotive] and carved matching grain to the surviving wood. Found the matching hue and voilà problem solved. I don't remember what finish.

If you go the veneer path - most likely easier - be sure to rebuilt the missing corner areas for support.

Russ
 

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Our dog decided to rebel recently and scratched and chipped a cabinet in our den.
As you can see, there are a number of deep scratches and some chunks taken out of the corner, that's the part that concerns me the most.

What is the best way to repair, especially the missing pieces?
Once repaired, I plan to refinish the entire piece.

View attachment 424337
Back when I was in college and painting houses to get by I often had to do repairs from dogs, kids or drunk college students (I got a lot of work on rentals). I used a product called Durhams Water Putty, if I remember the name correctly. It's a powder that you mix with water and apply with a putty knife. When it dries you can sand it, paint it, or whatever.

There are also some wood putty products available that are made to be stained. I'm not sure how well they work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the suggestions, much appreciated.

*Gary--I'll look into veneer, see if I can find a color/species match
*Russ--Bondo will certainly fill the scratches and chips, but I plan to refinish/re-stain. Not certain if Bondo accepts stain?
*David--I am familiar with Durhams Water Putty, our local Home Depot still carries it. I'll do a test piece and see if it accepts stain.
I came across a product called "Goodfilla" like water putty, it's a powder you mix with water, but their site says it can also
be mixed with stain. I may give that a try too.
 

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For flat repairs on sheetrock Durhams is great. Not so much on impact areas like corners - too soft. No, bondo would need to be colored/painted. It would just laugh at wood stain.

I still think the veneer cap is the best visual approach.

Russ
 

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Just to be clear...In my post #2....I was not suggesting veneer. I was suggesting making small strips similar to what is in the front doors, and gluing onto the corners to cover the damage. Then refinish. Since color and wood match would be difficult I would consider painting it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just to be clear...In my post #2....I was not suggesting veneer. I was suggesting making small strips similar to what is in the front doors, and gluing onto the corners to cover the damage. Then refinish. Since color and wood match would be difficult I would consider painting it.
Sorry Gary, I misunderstood. I never thought of replacing the strips...thanks.
 
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