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Hi all looking for some advice, I am a beginner and recently tried to apply a satin gloss finish to a coffee table. It was from a spray can, everything was going ok until the spray can started dripping and left drip stains on the table. I then tried to scrub it off with a toothbrush but that left even worse marks. Now I dont know what to do. Any advice would be appreciated. Is my table even salvageable?
 

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I'm not sure what I'm seeing. It appears when the varnish dripped you cleaned it off and by cleaning it took the stain off. If this is the case then the excess stain wasn't wiped off and the finish could later peal off. It's a mistake to have any stain dry on the surface. Stain doesn't adhere like paint and when you put a finish over the top the finish adheres to the stain instead of the wood.

From where you are the easiest fix would be to strip the finish off and start over. Another option would be to touch up the color with touch up markers. You go ahead and sand the finish making it ready to spray another coat and then use the markers. It's going to be difficult to find a marker which matches for color well enough. It might be too yellow or red which will make the spots look worse than it does now. Try it on one spot, marking a small spot in the middle and blend it in with your finger. When you think you have it wet the spot with water and see if you have it right before doing more.

You can get touch up markers at walmart in the furniture polish isle, but it has only three colors, light, medium and dark. The light marker is the only one in the set which might work for you. Another option would be to order a few different markers in the color range you need. http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/catalog_browse.asp?ictNbr=120
 

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Go buy some Varnish remover and start over. Be sure and follow the directions.
That's one option.


The second is a light sanding of the table as a whole, with a little direct focus on the problem area's.
Meaning to use you're sand paper too feather out the drip marks without completely burning through
the finish.


Also for you too get the result you did either you're products spray nozzle is crap, or you're spray method is.
I'm thinking it might be a little of both.


I don't use varnish on my tables. But I am in the minority here on that subject. I use "Helmsman Spar Urethane".
From past discussions here, I have concluded that many of the knowledgeable talented people here, prefer varnish,
to the product I use. Perhaps one of them will speak up and offer you better advice on varnish. The advice I have offered
is my method of correcting the problem with Spar Urethane, and should work with varnish as well. I could be wrong.


Be sure when you apply the spray you are doing full steady strokes left then right from about 10" from the surface. Stopping and
starting the spray stream at the end of each pass. This will help from the fluid gathering on the spray nozzle and causing drips.


If you are buying a cheap product with the standard spray can nozzle that could also cause you're dripping problem. The Helmsman
has an outstanding spray nozzle, and it's spray pattern is adjustable as well. I have provided a picture of my preferred product, obviously
you would purchase the spray can version of it.


Also a picture of my work so you could judge for yourself my claims of the products results.


Good Luck!
 

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