Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
beginner woodworker here. I'm trying to remove a couple layers of paint from a coffee table (about 3 x 5 ft). I want to stain and vanish later. I started to use 60 grit vibrating sander (square kind). But wondering if I'm doing it right. The paint is slowly coming off. I've had to change sandpaper a few times but at this rate its going to take me 24 sheets of 60 grit just to get the paint off from the top! Is this normal? Would using an orbital sander be quicker? Would using chemicals be better? Is this a patience is a virtue learning lesson? :wallbash:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hello dzobrist,

I have ever removed paint from the surface to refinish my workpiece.
You can use something called "Paint Remover". I don't know how to find it there. A little clue, the material of Paint Remover is Caustic Soda.

But be careful of this substance. It can make your skin feels itchy after contact with it.

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
beginner woodworker here. I'm trying to remove a couple layers of paint from a coffee table (about 3 x 5 ft). I want to stain and vanish later. I started to use 60 grit vibrating sander (square kind). But wondering if I'm doing it right. The paint is slowly coming off. I've had to change sandpaper a few times but at this rate its going to take me 24 sheets of 60 grit just to get the paint off from the top! Is this normal? Would using an orbital sander be quicker? Would using chemicals be better? Is this a patience is a virtue learning lesson? :wallbash:
Though caustic soda is an ingredient of some strippers especially the dip tank type, for brush on types the removal chemicals are mostly methylene chloride and methanol as an activating solvent, meaning it energizers the MC to penetrate the coating faster and better, do-not exceed 10% by volume of the methanol [wood alcohol, Hastings spirits, columbine spirits, methyl alcohol, methylated spirits, methyl hydrate, > CH3OH< }

Also please use protective rubber gloves when usuing and other protective equipment ok? dangerous stuff so dont get in eyes or on skin etc..!!!

You will also need a parrifin wax [5%] addition to form a surface barrier from to fast evaporation or use some plastic wrap to cover tightly to do the same. if wax is used you will after scraping need to wash the surface several times with clean rags and lacquer thinner to insure the wax is gone and once or twice in between your sanding grits ok? Acetone/toluol/xylol/or other solvents can also be incorporated for softning the finish.

PS: NEVER use 60 grit on the wood, way to course, at most 120 grit on a square sander followed by 150/180/220 and 320 if a very smooth surface is desired ok?

Sincerely,
Chemmy / sam
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I would first start with the least toxic of the chemical strippers. I would start with a waterbase stripper called Citristrip. It's sold in most home centers. It smells like oranges, and can be used indoors, and cleans up with water. If one or two applications don't remove all of the paint, try one more because you have a whole bottle.

If the waterbase stripper just doesn't do the job, then try an MC based (methylene chloride) stripper. It's very toxic and should remove whatever is there. You can buy a very good over the counter MC stripper called "Aircraft Stripper", in the blue can. It's sold in auto paint and body repair supply stores.

As with any stripper, follow the directions to a "T".





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
Hanig travelled the east, i'm sure they donot have either citristrip or or few auto body stores in "Indonesia" that have brand name strippers.,therefore my basic formula which may be purchased as individual products and mixed, if able to be found.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Hanig travelled the east, i'm sure they donot have either citristrip or or few auto body stores in "Indonesia" that have brand name strippers.,therefore my basic formula which may be purchased as individual products and mixed, if able to be found.
Products can be ordered if there aren't local sources of supply. I wouldn't suggest to any DIY'er to purchase chemicals like that and mix their own. He could as an alternative just use a heat gun and a putty knife.

Solving problems with the least amount of confusion and indulgence while keeping individual safety in mind makes forum participation worthwhile.






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
Products can be ordered if there aren't local sources of supply. I wouldn't suggest to any DIY'er to purchase chemicals like that and mix their own. He could as an alternative just use a heat gun and a putty knife.

Solving problems with the least amount of confusion and indulgence while keeping individual safety in mind makes forum participation worthwhile.








.
your correct CM, a good point on the torch and scraper, you should have posted that first lol. I'm aware of the shipping issue also, but as with my south american freind Carlos, he has trouble finding many things and is much closer than Indonesia. I would presume that a man in the middle of a project looking for help would not want to wait along period of time, as Carlo does, to receive the products, thus my intention to try and guide him to possibly looking for things that may be much more readily available right now, than paying 2-3 or more times the price, for shipping one or two items from here ok?

As carlos just told me 2 days ago he found some items i had told him to get, with prices ranging from as much as 80.00 a liter from here to there, how much more from here to Indonesia? Not looking for a "quarrel" Cman, just like you i'm only supplying info that i think is sound and useable in the circumstances as they are given by the poster, ok? :yes: In his post he is complaining of the cost of 20 or more sheets of sanding paper which is less a cost there than here. I believe he would not want to pay 2-3 timess the price for a 20-30 dollar or more hazerdous material shipment of my chemicals or regular shipping of yours, in this case.

PS: i think i gave good safety info on handling the MC an methanol, and i agree with you on that.

Chemmy.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
your correct CM, a good point on the torch and scraper, you should have posted that first lol.
I try to keep things simple. I didn't suggest a heat gun and a putty knife, as that isn't as easy as brushing on paint stripper. Anyone that has done any extent of finishing or refinishing would have made that suggestion. I'm surprised that you didn't.:smile:






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
I try to keep things simple. I didn't suggest a heat gun and a putty knife, as that isn't as easy as brushing on paint stripper. Anyone that has done any extent of finishing or refinishing would have made that suggestion. I'm surprised that you didn't.:smile:









.
LOL, excuse me "heat gun and putty knife", though i have used a propane torch and scraper your correct, it is what was available to me at the time. lol, but that was for removing house paint not furniture. No, you will always see me posting chemical answers over mechanical, if i have a choice. :yes:
 

·
Varnish neanderthalensis
Joined
·
63 Posts
First of all, thank you Chemmy and Cabinetman, both of you are very helpful, each in his own way, even confllicting information can be very positive, thanks, chemmy is correct about how products are sometimes hard to find in remote locations, solids we can get it shipped, but liquids, post 9/11, virtually impossible.

I am doing lots of thick varnish removal here, tried all removers available down here, found one, probably similar to chemmy;s recipe, so my limited experience says, try to find a gel remover, it may be a good one. I've tried 3 different gel removers, only one was any good.

As down here in Brazil, there is probably a multinational such as Azko-Nobel, making something decent over there...good luck....and happy holydays to all of you...:smile::thumbsup:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top