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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I am working on a table top which is glued up with some board. I use titebond 3 and biscuit to joint board together. However, after I applied glue, I didn't clean it up immediately. The glue and drips become hard and it seems impossible to remove. I tried sanding but it take forever to do it. I also use a chisel but I cut into the wood.

In your guys experience, what is the best way to remove harden glue?

Thank you some much.

Richard
 

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If you stay after it with a chisel you'll probably end up with a gouge that is harder to fix. Titebond III is waterproof so you won't be able to soak it off. You will have to sand it off. Try coarser sandpaper until you get the glue worn down and then change to finer paper.

Personally, I always belt sand wood like that first. It gets rid of glue pretty quickly however like any other tool you have to learn how to use it or it will cause more damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you stay after it with a chisel you'll probably end up with a gouge that is harder to fix. Titebond III is waterproof so you won't be able to soak it off. You will have to sand it off. Try coarser sandpaper until you get the glue worn down and then change to finer paper.

Personally, I always belt sand wood like that first. It gets rid of glue pretty quickly however like any other tool you have to learn how to use it or it will cause more damage.
Hi Steve, thanks. I am not very good at belt sander. But I will try.
 

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Hi Steve, thanks. I am not very good at belt sander. But I will try.
Try to keep the sander flat and pretty much let the weight of the sander do the work. By applying pressure you end up tipping the sander to one corner or the other and this causes dents in the wood that are so slight you can't see them. It's always best when using a hand held belt sander to thoroughly sand the wood with random orbital sander afterwards. Regardless of the skill of the operator it's a case of better safe than sorry by doing this. These dents won't show up until you put a finish on the project, sometimes the finish coat. By then it means refinishing to fix it.
 

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I'm with Mylar - block plane and better yet scraper!

If you're new to woodworking, you may not know about scrapers. They are what folks used before sandpaper entered the shop. My scrapers are essential to my workshop. The basic ones are the card scrapers and my Stanley #80, both pictured here but the 2nd picture shows the Stanley #80 cleaning up burn marks left by a dull blade. I've used it to scrape paints and finishes off table tops etc. Learn how to sharpen these tools and they will be good friends in your shop.
 

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I have used a flat scraper like Bernie is showing, I did cut a chunk of wood and rounded it over and then cut a kerf in it with the bandsaw, so the blade would fit in the kerf, makes it easier on the hands, if you push it the glue will pop right off, but you will have to go to a wood working store to find one, never was able ti find one in a big box
 

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+1 for the scraper suggestion. The burr on the edge has such a fine, fine cutting action. Takes time.
I make my own from pieces of that hard steel strapping that is used to bind slings of lumber. They're not really efficient but for the number of wood carving times that I need them, the price is right.
 

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File this under the horse ran away years ago and you're still trying to close the barn door, but clean it up before, not after it's dry..
I bet you never thought of that fancy schmancy trick..Didja? :unsure:
 

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File this under the horse ran away years ago and you're still trying to close the barn door, but clean it up before, not after it's dry..
I bet you never thought of that fancy schmancy trick..Didja? :unsure:
I always get at least a thin film I need to scrape away. Just a yellow tint to the area
 

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I always get at least a thin film I need to scrape away. Just a yellow tint to the area
Really? I don't. Wipe it clean with clean water and a rag and lightly sand it after it dries..Should solve the problem. I nice sharp scrapper should get rid of any residue if there's any left..
 
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