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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK thinking about a dust collection system, currently just use my shopvac and just move it to what ever saw I am using...thinking about the harbor freight 2 hp. Just at the stage of planning, don't have it yet. What I want to do is stage it in the corner of the shop and pipe it to each tool with a blast gate for each station, CSMS, table saw, bandsaw and router table. The problem I can't seem to get my head around, is turning it on/off, I don't want to walk over to the corner of the shop just to turn this on, then back to the tools, then back to the corner to turn it off...what PIA. How is every one handling this, do I wire a separate switch at each station to turn on/off, how does that work, I would have no idea how wire that up, or is there some kind of remote I can use that I carry with me, I'm stumped.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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For me in my shop, the collector is in the corner and plugged into a switched outlet. From there I have a switch centrally located in the shop. It wouldn't work well in a large shop, but for my mid size basement shop it's effective and only cost me 10 bucks for a motor rated 220 switch.
 

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There are a number of DC remote switches available. I used a Long Ranger for a lot of years before I dropped the remote onto the concrete once too often. I replaced it with a Shop Fox, which didn't seem quite as well built. It lasted about a year. If your at all comfortable working with electrical gadgets, you can get a contactor and make your own. These amount to a relay that's switched by a coil. To power the coil on/pff you use a simple lamp remote switch (the $10 jobs). Then if the remote fails you simply change it out, the contactors are commercial grade gizmos that last a very long time. You can build this (I just built one in 120V for my sprayer turbine) for less than $30. Or, if you can find ne of the lamp switch type remotes that can handle a higher load, just get one of them....it may have to be rated at 15 amps or so, those are a little harder to find. If you want to roll your own, check back. Any number of us can get you going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ya I was thinking remote, don't need the 220v the HF dust collector is only 120v, but it's 20 amp and all the 120v switch remotes I find are only 15 amp for lights and such. Plus they all seem to do multiple plugs but one remote switch. I needed the other way around, one plug 20 amp and multiple switches..lol...I am sure someone makes one, just can't find it. I wouldn't be opposed to hard wiring one, just not real sure how to wire multiple switches to one outlet. The wireless route definitely easier.
 

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I have been using a cheap remote with three on/off stations for over a year. One is for the HF dust collector, one is for a shop fan with filter taped over the front. The other is for the shop vac that is connected to the miter saw station. $18 something on Amazon.

Saying that, I did have one of the remote modules go out and it was the one for the HF DC. I switched it out with one of the others and now I am back in business. I bought a cheep remote (Christmas tree lights remote) at Lowe's to run the shop vac.

If another module goes out, I might consider the Rockler Remote.
 

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Mr. Stringer hit the nail on the head. I use a exterior ornamental light remote. I super glued a rare earth magnet on the back of the remote and it stays on whatever machine is hooked up. BTW, mine's a 15 amp unit. Testing revealed that my HF DC pulled 16 amp for a millisecond on start up then, back to 12-14 in operation.
 

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.......How is every one handling this, do I wire a separate switch at each station to turn on/off, how does that work, I would have no idea how wire that up, or is there some kind of remote I can use that I carry with me, I'm stumped.
remotes require another operation when activating a power tool. that is, after activating the tool, one has to activate the other device (DC) with a remote control. i prefer to have DC (s) activate automatically. i use ivac switches daisy chained to activate both my DC and shop vac whenever a dust generating tool is activated.

http://www.ivacswitch.com/default.action?itemid=13

first rate products from a first rate company.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
remotes require another operation when activating a power tool. that is, after activating the tool, one has to activate the other device (DC) with a remote control. i prefer to have DC (s) activate automatically. i use ivac switches daisy chained to activate both my DC and shop vac whenever a dust generating tool is activated.

http://www.ivacswitch.com/default.action?itemid=13

first rate products from a first rate company.
I understand what your saying, but really not applicable to my situation, since I only need the remote for the DC. I'll be standing in front of the tool, no need for a remote for that tool and I won't be hitting the remote and the tool switch at the same time. I'll use the remote to the DC, then turn on the tool, reversing the order when done.

What I am trying to get around is using one remote for the DC and taking it from work station to work station. I really what a switch for the DC at each station close to my tools power button. I don't want to hunt around for a remote, because dollar to donuts, that one remote is always going to end up on a tool on the other side of the shop from the tool I want to use...:laughing:
 

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I understand what your saying, but really not applicable to my situation, since I only need the remote for the DC. I'll be standing in front of the tool, no need for a remote for that tool and I won't be hitting the remote and the tool switch at the same time. I'll use the remote to the DC, then turn on the tool, reversing the order when done.

What I am trying to get around is using one remote for the DC and taking it from work station to work station. I really what a switch for the DC at each station close to my tools power button. I don't want to hunt around for a remote, because dollar to donuts, that one remote is always going to end up on a tool on the other side of the shop from the tool I want to use...:laughing:
If you find a remote with a key chain, your problem will be solved. :thumbsup: I bought one at Lowe's that has the key chain clip.
 

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Ya I was thinking remote, don't need the 220v the HF dust collector is only 120v, but it's 20 amp and all the 120v switch remotes I find are only 15 amp for lights and such.
You've been seduced by the dark side; the HF ratings are fairly inaccurate, they also call that a 2 HP motor when it's closer to 1.5. As some others mentioned, the 15 amp switch should serve you well. Multiple outlets isn't something you need, but you don't have to use them. Besides, it will give you a spare receiver (admittingly, that's not what usually fails). Or, consider the relay thing I menioned earlier.
 

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What is the benefit of a dust collector system over a shop vac? I understand that the DC system can be stationary and have lines run to each piece of equipment but I'm seeing the DC systems being ~2hp and my shop vac says 6hp. What gives?
 

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I use this one

http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LR220-3.html?prodpage=1LR

If you sign up for their news letter you can get 10% (or $10 don't remember) discount upon signing up for a news letter with your first visit to pennstateind.

The 110 volt one is $10 less.

It is a very good unit except that the base unit develops amnesia about the remote. It only takes a few seconds to reprogram the remote/base unit. Mine has lost the remote twice in 10 years.
 
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I understand what your saying, but really not applicable to my situation, since I only need the remote for the DC. I'll be standing in front of the tool, no need for a remote for that tool ...
the type I believe tooguy was reffering was one that senses when you turn on the tool, and then automatically turns on the dc system. i think sears sells one of these also.
 

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What is the benefit of a dust collector system over a shop vac? I understand that the DC system can be stationary and have lines run to each piece of equipment but I'm seeing the DC systems being ~2hp and my shop vac says 6hp. What gives?

They are 2 very different machines. The vac draws small amounts of air (100+CFM or so) at very high static pressures (resistance to air flow). The DC is the opposite, it draws huge volumes of air (400-1500 cfm) at low static pressures. Choke a DC down with a vac hose and it won't have any air flow at all. To capture the finest dust particles you need large amounts of air movement, and then very fine filtration to contain it. As for HP ratings, those given for shopvacs are about as wrong as they can be. As I understand it, that rating is called "locked rotor" and is the power it develops just before it croaks. DC's generally have induction motors that are typically (but not always) closer to the true continuous HP they deliver.
 
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