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Few years ago, when I made this remote control for my shop dust collector I did not think it was worth publishing. Recently I noticed a forum discussion asking for details so here it is.

No experience in electronics, just basic understanding of electricity and current flow, and some basic tools are needed in order to build this unit, which essentially is a collection of off-the-shelf building blocks we integrate into a working system.

Click below for photos:
http://ninoransenberg.com/2013/08/03/remote-control-for-shop-dust-collector/

We start with a remote and a receiver used for garage door opening and similar applications. Usually they come as a set but you can also buy them separately and teach the receiver to recognize a specific remote. The other two parts in the box are a power supply needed to provide current to the receiver. You can use an open frame power supply mounted inside the box as I did or a wall-socket power supply that will keep the box smaller and less packed. If you have electronics junk laying around, most probably you can find a power supply you can use from an old printer and many other devices, just make sure it provide the same voltage needed by the receiver. The relay, which switches the dust collector on and off, is also not a specific component and can have many implementations. In my case I used a Solid State Relay (SSR), which acts like a mechanical relay but has no moving parts. It is more reliable but for this application, any relay that can hold the power needed by the dust collector will do. Make sure to check the power (Volts X Amps) your DC drawn and match the relay to support it as minimum.

Finally, you need to wire the power supply to the receiver, pair between the receiver and the remote control (usually done by removing the "teach" jumper from the receiver's PCB, clicking on the remote button and replacing the jumper), and wire the relay from the main supply to the dust collector using standard plug and socket.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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My dust collector runs on 230 volts. The kids got me a "Long Ranger" from Penn State Industries. I think that it was $70 for the 230 model and $60 for the 115 volt model.

What can I say, it works.
 

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Sawdust Mill Operator
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I was thinking of figuring a way to have my dust collector come on anytime I turn on a machine that it is hooked to. Like with a set of relays. For the table saw, miter saw, router table, planer etc, and then for the smalled things like the sanders I could just have a switch on the wall next to the sanding table. thoughts?
 

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I was thinking of figuring a way to have my dust collector come on anytime I turn on a machine that it is hooked to. Like with a set of relays. For the table saw, miter saw, router table, planer etc, and then for the smalled things like the sanders I could just have a switch on the wall next to the sanding table. thoughts?
There is a commercial product which does this. Take a look for inspiration.

http://www.ivacswitch.com/default.action?itemid=13
 

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I was thinking of figuring a way to have my dust collector come on anytime I turn on a machine that it is hooked to. Like with a set of relays. For the table saw, miter saw, router table, planer etc, and then for the smalled things like the sanders I could just have a switch on the wall next to the sanding table. thoughts?
+1 on previous ivac suggestion. i use two of the original ivac switches daisy chained together, to facilitate shop vac and DC activation whenever a power tools is activated. the ivac switches, and the company producing them, are first rate in every respect.
 

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I was thinking of figuring a way to have my dust collector come on anytime I turn on a machine that it is hooked to. Like with a set of relays. For the table saw, miter saw, router table, planer etc, and then for the smalled things like the sanders I could just have a switch on the wall next to the sanding table. thoughts?
pretty sure that sears sells a device for this application. our fein shop vacs have it built in - nice feature.

the prime issue with any remote switching device is the voltage/current rating of the contacts, that will switch the load on and off. take care to check the voltage and amps of the device you want to switch on and off, and make sure the remote switch meets or exceeds that capability. if not, an intermediate relay will be required (remote switch activates the relay, the larger relay contacts turn on the load).
 

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where's my table saw?
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another issue

pretty sure that sears sells a device for this application. our fein shop vacs have it built in - nice feature.

the prime issue with any remote switching device is the voltage/current rating of the contacts, that will switch the load on and off. take care to check the voltage and amps of the device you want to switch on and off, and make sure the remote switch meets or exceeds that capability. if not, an intermediate relay will be required (remote switch activates the relay, the larger relay contacts turn on the load).
Another issue is the total load on the circuit. If the DC is on 120 V and the tool is plugged into the same circuit whether through the remote switch or separately, the total start up current had better not exceed the rating for that circuit or you be tripping breakers. Some remotes may have a time delay, but I don't know if that will solve this issue...
If the DC is on 220 V then less of an issue.
For example my 6.5 HP(not) Rigid shop vac and my 14" Craftsman 1 HP bandsaw are on 120 v but on separate circuits. The shop vac is on n outdoor remote similar to the ones posted above.
And:
My 1 1/2HP Jet DC is on 120V and on a separate circuit from the 12" 1 1/2 HP Grizzly baby drum sander.
 

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pretty sure that sears sells a device for this application. our fein shop vacs have it built in - nice feature.

the prime issue with any remote switching device is the voltage/current rating of the contacts, that will switch the load on and off. take care to check the voltage and amps of the device you want to switch on and off, and make sure the remote switch meets or exceeds that capability. if not, an intermediate relay will be required (remote switch activates the relay, the larger relay contacts turn on the load).
sears' switch is the Autoswitch. it's what i started with. but as is noted, the primary and slave tools are on the same circuit. this can be an issue when using 1 hp and up tools. ivac switches activate the primary and slave tools on separate circuits.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-auto-switch/p-00924031000P?autoRedirect=true&sLevel=0&redirectType=SKIP_LEVEL
 
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