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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have an old table saw + 20 tears still works perfectly other than the plastic base falling apart and the metal table is a pain my plan is to pull the motor assemble then reattach it to a reinforced 3/4 in ply wood top using an old cabinet that i will reinforce using ply wood and 2x4 as well as gluing and screwing as needed
my question is any other tips or ideas to make it stronger
 

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i have an old table saw + 20 tears still works perfectly other than the plastic base falling apart and the metal table is a pain my plan is to pull the motor assemble then reattach it to a reinforced 3/4 in ply wood top using an old cabinet that i will reinforce using ply wood and 2x4 as well as gluing and screwing as needed
my question is any other tips or ideas to make it stronger
It's difficult to visualize what you have in mind. Can you post some pictures of the saw.
 

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where's my table saw?
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need some photos

Are you satying the table is NOT cast iron, but a stamped steel? The base is plastic? Never heard of such a saw. Pictures would be most helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
this is the only pic i have of the cabinets the one on the left will house the saw and this is a very similar saw the one i have is a black and decker, after futher research i am going to use mdf and Mylar sandwiched together for a smooth top and price saving non warping base. basically i think two layers of mdf toped with Mylar
ps the cabinets are 2'x2'x3'roughly
 

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where's my table saw?
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why not use the table as is?

Most folks who do this, make a larger plywood panel and set the saw in from the front. This allows you to utilize the miter slot and the fence and the throat plate that came with the original saw table.


If you just use the saw's undercarriage and motor assembly, it will mean making mounts in the plywood at all the correct points and making a throat plate and brackets for the tilt and elevation controls... a whole lot of work.

If this saw is such a pain, you may be better off to pick up a second hand cast iron table saw off Craig's list and improve on that one. I used a Craftsman 10" table saw for about 40 years before I parted it out saving the table for an extension an another saw. Saws don't really wear out except the bearings and they are cheap and easy to replace.

I have a Bosch portable or job site saw with an aluminum table and plastic cabinet. It's just fine for moving from site to site and it's even accurate enough for some pretty fine work. It doesn't compare to my cast iron table saws however. Most cheap portable saws are very noisy compared to the induction motors in the cast iron saws. The fence on my Bosch is very accurate for an aluminum setup, but I don't know about a Black and Decker?

That's my opinion.
 

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Sounds like youre trying to do what this guy did:
http://www.ibuildit.ca/table-saw-1.html

Quite the project youve got in mind, rebuilding everything but the trunnions and motor. Building a new top to hang everything off of will likely be the biggest challenge, youve got to find a way to make sure its dead flat, wont sag under the weight and wont move out of flat with humidity changes, all without making it so thick you lose an inch and a half of cut depth and thus decrease the usability of the saw. Youve also got to figure out a way to cut 2 straight and parallel miter slots, as well as some sort of throat plate system, which is admittedly the easy part.

After you somehow manage to surmount the issue of making the top, then you have to make a cabinet that supports the top while simultaneously allowing easy access to the tilt and elevation controls without interfering with either, as well as whatever dust collection you choose to add

Fun fact, see the article i posted up top of the guy who built his own saw using parts from a portable one? The author no longer uses that saw, he ditched it in favor of an old contractor saw, similar to the craigslist special crafstman woodnthings mentioned:
http://www.ibuildit.ca/Workshop Projects/rebuild-table-saw-1.html

So, he ditched the one he made, using a similar method to what youre proposing, in favor of just getting a different saw. Make of that what you will
 

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The saw is designed to be portable for a trim carpenter to carry to jobsites. Making a cabinet like woodenthings has illustrated would make it more useful in the shop however this type saw lacks power and if you are having trouble with the stamped top on the saw I would think about replacing the saw. I think I would at least upgrade to a contractor saw and there isn't anything wrong with buying a used saw. If it appears to have been taken care of a used saw could last you for decades.
 
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