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Discussion Starter #1
I completed a couple of newbie projects last year and the router seemed to work exceptionally well. My last try in the last few days didn't seem so good. Got way too wavy a line even though I tried to hold firmly to the fence. Also, I never paid much attention, but the Dewalt plunge has a crystal clear stage that surrounds the bit, but it seems to be getting in the way of my seeing the bit well.

I might have changed something that I forgot. Just a refresh on how to keep the bit exactly on top of the cutting line.
 

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Master firewood maker
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were you using a hand held router, or a router table with a fence? i'm guessing hand held because of the statement about the window to let you see the bit ...
 

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If ur using a hand held router. Wait to rip the trim to size till u cut the profile. This allows u to have more of a surface to keep the router stable. Sniff u have tear-out u are able to re-route without wasting stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yes, hand held plunge router. By "cut the profile" do you mean cut a shallow depth and go back at full depth? The bit is 3/4 inch straight bit, the same as the slot width I'm cutting.

The slot is a cross cut going completely across the the width of an 8" hardboard. The router is tending to bounce away from the fence, and I can't really see the cut because of the clear tray around the bit. So I'm forced to keep it steady by touch only, trying to keep it tight to the fence.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
P.S. My "fence" is one of those ruler type clamps that are clamped by pressing in one of the sliding clamps to lock. Would I be better off with the edge jig that fits on the router?
 

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Master firewood maker
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for things like that, if possible, I will put a fence on both sides of the router so that I have what is essentially a track. I usually just end up clamping down a couple of straight pieces on either side.

For a visual, I am referring to something along these lines...



Or this:



www.youtube.com/embed/7j4vGS4HY-8
 

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A lot of folks are starting to appreciate a dado guide like Chris shows and would help you immensely. But since you're using a 'bumper' guide, I think taking many shallow passes will help you. A 3/4" bit is a handful when routing, essentially 'handheld'.

Here's a pic of one of mine from Shopnotes, I think. It's self-clamping.

 

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In addition to what the others have said, make sure you're going the right direction. You want the bit turning so that it pulls against the fence, not away. Don't quote me, but I believe that should mean working left to right.

Stay safe,
Acer
 

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In addition to what the others have said, make sure you're going the right direction. You want the bit turning so that it pulls against the fence, not away. Don't quote me, but I believe that should mean working left to right.

Stay safe,
Acer
Quoted! :laughing: And, yes, it's left to right! :thumbsup:

You can use the right hand thumb rule. Make a "thumbs up" gesture. Point your right thumb up or down like it is a bit in a router. Up for in a table, down for freehand cutting. Whatever direction your fingers are pointing is the way the bit spins. This will help you visualize how to move the router on the wood so that the bit digs into it, and does not roll along the edge like a wheel. In cutting a dado, press the router base into your clamped bumper rail and move left to right and the bit will try to pull the router into the rail instead of away from it.
 
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