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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I recently purchased a teak G-Plan dining table, and am keen to try and restore it to its previous glory.

Having read through a number of threads, I understand that it would be wise to use a chemical based solution to remove any existing varnish, oil and grime and to then apply a teak oil.

As you can see from the image, there are a few water marks on the surface and I wondered if there were any thoughts on which products might enable me to achieve the best results?

The last thing I want to do is become too aggressive and use a general purpose varnish / paint stripper if this is not required;

Table Furniture Wood Wood stain Coffee table


With time at a premium I am keen to try and get this right first time if possible and any advice / guidance would therefore be very gratefully received.

Many thanks in advance.

Kind regards,

James
 

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It's always best when you refinish to use a methylene chloride based paint and varnish remover. Some folks just try to sand the old finish off but you just get what is on the surface. Before you use the remover though wash the table down with a wax and grease remover. If there is any silicone from furniture polish on the table the wax and grease remover will take most of it off. If you just start with remover if there is any silicone on the table it will just go into the wood. After you get the finish off and sanded wash the table down again with acetone to remove any natural waxes that might be on the wood. I would then seal the wood with Zinsser Sealcoat before topcoating. Then the table can be finished with whatever finish you choose. I would recommend Behlen Rock Hard Table Top Finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Steve,

Many thanks indeed for your comprehensive response - this is very much appreciated and very helpful.

In respect of the final treatment, I was hoping to achieve a satin finish and wondered whether a teak oil would achieve this. I've had limited experience using teak oil and wasn't sure as to whether it would be representative of the original finish.

In addition to the surface, presumably the same treatment could be undertaken for the legs, sides and chairs if required?

Many thanks again Steve.

Kind regards,

James
 

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g-plan

I believe that originally g-plan furniture had shellac finish. I have a few pieces (sideboards, tables) from the series with black (carbonised?) legs. some of them were refinished with lacquer prior to being purchased by me, but I recently refinised a coffee table with shellac and did a proper french polish.
There's simply no comparison between painted and french polished one - the latter looks simply fantastic and the effort is well worth it.
 

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Sure you can use the teal oil finish however it won't give you very much protection from water rings. It's not that difficult to fix though, just a little sanding and re-oil. I just always prefer to use a film finish on a table top.
 

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Apologies for bumping an incredibly old thread but I am undertaking a similar project but wondered if any could recommend what type finishing lacquer to use and what commercially available products will do the job?

Thanks!
 

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Apologies for bumping an incredibly old thread but I am undertaking a similar project but wondered if any could recommend what type finishing lacquer to use and what commercially available products will do the job?

Thanks!
A nitrocellulose lacquer like the box stores sell would be the easiest lacquer to use however it isn't very water resistant. You could use a lacquer sanding sealer which covers easy and builds fast. Used on a table top I would be inclined to use a pre-catalyzed lacquer. It's more water resistant than nitro lacquer. You use a vinyl sealer with pre-catalyzed. If you are finishing teak as the original poster be sure to wash the wood down with acetone frequently changing rags to remove as much of the natural oils as possible.
 
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