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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I sawed 8/4 and 6x6 ,s I almost kept it but I had a customer picking it up today I have plenty more logs to saw,plus I kept the butt cut off of that tree. I learned this much today the longer those elm logs lay the more colors you see when you saw them that tree was cut in January. I am in wv if anyone wants some I can saw more.
 

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Sawing against the Wind
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I missed this last night. That wood is pretty......I think all of them look better when allowed to age!!! I haven't cut any but I do have a smaller one laying around that should be ready. Thanks for showing the pics!!
 
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Ed
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Cool, your pics helped me to know for sure that the logs I am cutting are red elm rather than rock elm, the guy that I got them from said they were slippery elm, but without any leaves I had no way to tell for sure.

The little bit I have cut has sure turned out pretty...




This red elm is some of the prettiest wood I have ever worked with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
it is pretty wood,i have noticed that it likes to move a lot when you saw it. I am partial to grey elm I like the red and white mix you get when you cut it,due to larger amount of sap wood, I plan on doing a floor in our loft with grey elm.
 

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Pretty stuff but my experience (though very little) is that elm is hard to work with.
Mine too....it's prone to movement, and it fuzzes pretty easily on crosscuts even with sharp blades....warning - that "fuzz" can be pretty darn stiff, and can draw blood if you try to wipe it away with your hands...it's more like a serrated knife! :thumbdown: I did find that it's reasonably stable if you let it acclimate well, dimension it slightly oversized, then let it acclimate for another day or two before cutting to final dimensions. Well worth the effort IMO. :thumbsup:
 

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My experience with elm is that it's beautiful & colorful when fresh off the mill, but turns gray when dry, and doesn't get the color back. A dull, faint rusty color is as bright as I have ever seen dry elm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My experience with elm is that it's beautiful & colorful when fresh off the mill, but turns gray when dry, and doesn't get the color back. A dull, faint rusty color is as bright as I have ever seen dry elm.
I hear that,wonder if there is some type of finish that will bring those colors back,or some process,etc.
 

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I did a sit down bench out of elm- seems like plenty of color.
 

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I hear that,wonder if there is some type of finish that will bring those colors back,or some process,etc.
Not that I know of. I cut a big piss-elm once that had the most vivid red/orange heartwood. If I didn't know it was elm, i'd have thought it was some exotic rosewood. Within days it was gray, and never had color again. Same thing with siberian elm. Some I cut is chocolate brown like walnut, but within days it turns gray & stays that way.
 

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I did a sit down bench out of elm- seems like plenty of color.
Unfortunately, that's as colorful as dry elm will be. Don't get me wrong. That is beautiful wood you have there, but I would bet it was tremendously more colorful than that when it was fresh off the mill.
 

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It was dull- before finish- BLO and General satin finish did make quite a difference.
 
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