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Do you like using recycled pallet wood?

  • No!

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • I'm not sure.

    Votes: 3 17.6%
  • Sure, why not?

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • Yes!

    Votes: 6 35.3%
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Custom Pallet Wood Pro
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This and more available at: http://blogspud.blogspot.com/2012/07/pallet-board-corner-entertainment.html

Hey Everybody!

Okay, so after the completion of my last project with pallet wood, I have turned my attention to an issue, my current embarrassment of an entertainment center.



To be fair to myself, this was one of my first projects, it had doors, had a coat hanger pole, and was actually a dresser.

But since we have moved, it is causing a bit of a clutter and is incredibly imposing. So what better time than now to use my pallet project to build a new entertainment center with pallet wood!Starting tomorrow evening, I will begin construction of my new entertainment center. Nothing fancy, but it will look Rustic and will, to the best of my ability, be perfect for my situation with a custom feel. Check out my plans below and stay alert for my updates on this project.





 

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looks like it should be pretty awesome. can't wait to see the finished product. i'm always a big proponent of upcycling things like pallets.
 

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I'm interested in seeing how this comes out. The only thing I have built out of pallets is planters...didn't find the wood to be of very good quality.
 

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Log dog
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ftk said:
I'm interested in seeing how this comes out. The only thing I have built out of pallets is planters...didn't find the wood to be of very good quality.
There's a whole lot of quality pallets out there.
The key is how you dress them up after you tear them apart. It's all in the type of things you build out of them.
 

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There's a whole lot of quality pallets out there.
I guess I'm still not entirely convinced that using recycled pallets for building furniture is such a good idea, at least in regard to possible health safety issues. I realize it's a controversial subject. Some people insist that used pallets are no more hazardous than new lumber on the shelf at a big box store, while others insist that used pallets can pose all kinds of dangers from hidden contaminants lurking in the grain.

Complicating the matter is the marketplace battle going on between the wood pallet industry and the plastic pallet industry. The plastic pallet people are accused of intentionally spreading rumors about wood pallet contamination (which I suppose they might do considering how much money is at stake), and the wood pallet people are accused of glossing over the issue (which I suppose they might also do in an attempt to preserve their current stake in the market).

I suppose the real truth falls somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. But since I tend to err on the side of caution, I have yet to build anything from a pallet.
 

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I guess I'm still not entirely convinced that using recycled pallets for building furniture is such a good idea, at least in regard to possible health safety issues. I realize it's a controversial subject. Some people insist that used pallets are no more hazardous than new lumber on the shelf at a big box store, while others insist that used pallets can pose all kinds of dangers from hidden contaminants lurking in the grain.

Complicating the matter is the marketplace battle going on between the wood pallet industry and the plastic pallet industry. The plastic pallet people are accused of intentionally spreading rumors about wood pallet contamination (which I suppose they might do considering how much money is at stake), and the wood pallet people are accused of glossing over the issue (which I suppose they might also do in an attempt to preserve their current stake in the market).

I suppose the real truth falls somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. But since I tend to err on the side of caution, I have yet to build anything from a pallet.
I'm assuming the contamination would come from something that leaked on the pallet. Wouldn't you see the stain? And if that were an issue, what about all the poor souls working at the pallet factories that refurbish them? Wouldn't 20/20 be doing some story about them all dying of weird diseases? Sounds like fear mongering to me.

I'm all for it. Can't wait to see the finished product!
 

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Log dog
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AndyDuframe said:
I guess I'm still not entirely convinced that using recycled pallets for building furniture is such a good idea, at least in regard to possible health safety issues. I realize it's a controversial subject. Some people insist that used pallets are no more hazardous than new lumber on the shelf at a big box store, while others insist that used pallets can pose all kinds of dangers from hidden contaminants lurking in the grain.

Complicating the matter is the marketplace battle going on between the wood pallet industry and the plastic pallet industry. The plastic pallet people are accused of intentionally spreading rumors about wood pallet contamination (which I suppose they might do considering how much money is at stake), and the wood pallet people are accused of glossing over the issue (which I suppose they might also do in an attempt to preserve their current stake in the market).

I suppose the real truth falls somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. But since I tend to err on the side of caution, I have yet to build anything from a pallet.
I guess you'll never know then. When working with pallets or any wood/sanding/dust I wear a respirator. Besides its not the pallets that will kill you, it's everything else in the air that you breath will kill you. It's not any worse than working/cutting pressure treated lumber. JMO
I like working with pallets. It's hidden beauty.
And most of all it's FREE!!!!!!
 

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I should be picking up pallets for this today...
Just curious -- where do you get your pallets?

Also, sometimes I hear people talk about picking up "free" pallets. This kind of puzzles me, because I've talked to people in the pallet industry, and they say pallets rarely go out with the trash. If pallets can't be repaired, they're sold to a recycle plant that grounds them into pulp.
 

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It's not any worse than working/cutting pressure treated lumber.
Well, I'm with you on that. I won't even get close to treated lumber without my gloves and a respirator (not the cheap cotton masks). I think the main concern people have with used pallets is about possible contamination of bacteria and unknown chemicals -- which you would be bringing into your home if you're using pallets to build indoor furniture. I think the bacteria issue is probably overblown -- since the little bugs don't normally survive more than a few hours after landing on a surface. It's the unknown chemicals that worry me. However, I suppose if you could be fairly certain where a particular pallet has been, what it's been used for, this might not be a problem.

And most of all it's FREE!!!!!!
Where do you get "free" pallets?
 

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Where do you get "free" pallets?
Don't go to a pallet company, then they're never free. Go to a manufacturing plant; an automotive plastics plant would be your safest bet if contaminates are a concern. Unless the plant manager is a weeny, they'll give you some for sure.

I manage a plastics recycling plant and we ship out 2 truckloads of pallets per week. They're almost all 48"x40". If someone came along looking for pallets I'd for sure give away 10 or so of them.

As far as pallets go, the only thing I wonder is how the HT pallets (heat treated) will finish. Maybe it doesn't make a differance? I know they look the same as the ones that aren't heat treated, but I have no idea what they do to heat treat them. Anyone here use the ones w/ the HT stamp on them? It'll be a 'HT' branded on the side of the pallet.
 

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Matt, it seems the ISPM 15 regulation is not "high" temperature.

"The IPPC edict, known as ISPM 15, gives wood packaging manufacturers the option of heat treatment, requiring that the wood core temperature reaches a minimum of 56 degrees Centigrade (132.8 F), for 30 minutes".

I interpret that the intent is to kill bugs and larva rather than "treat" the wood.

I think the pallet wood with HT should finish the same. I also think it is good to know the pallet at one time was bug free. :icon_smile:

There is a treatment method for decking material, which uses really high temperatures (> 400 F) and a vacuum. This is called Thermally Treated wood.
 

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Log dog
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@ Andy.
I'm not sure where your from, but I get all the ones I use for free. Most places around here are glad to give you them. It gets them off their property.
I'm pretty picky when I comes to pallets. I pick only the cleanest and the best ones I can find.
I like the character of some pallet wood. Most I've seen has been oak, pine, cherry, ash, and spalted something. And sometimes walnut.
See my thread hidden beauty.
And always wear a respirator.
 

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I guess you guys have more luck than me finding decent pallets -- the only ones I have found for free are made of crap pine.
 

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Matt, it seems the ISPM 15 regulation is not "high" temperature.

"The IPPC edict, known as ISPM 15, gives wood packaging manufacturers the option of heat treatment, requiring that the wood core temperature reaches a minimum of 56 degrees Centigrade (132.8 F), for 30 minutes".

I interpret that the intent is to kill bugs and larva rather than "treat" the wood.

I think the pallet wood with HT should finish the same. I also think it is good to know the pallet at one time was bug free. :icon_smile:

There is a treatment method for decking material, which uses really high temperatures (> 400 F) and a vacuum. This is called Thermally Treated wood.
Thanks!

Did a bit of research on this myself. You want to look at the stamps on the sides of the pallets and avoid any that say 'MB'. These pallets w/ this stamp were treated w/ a pesticide or chemicals that you neither want in your house, and definately don't want to be sanding, cutting or planing and breathing the dust. The MB pallets are no longer made; I guess they're phasing them out. But they may still be in use so look for them and avoid them.

Just as Dave stated, all the HT stamp means is they got the core temp of the wood up to 132.8 deg, which I would imagine has no effect on finishing.

Here's a good link: http://greenupgrader.com/19085/how-to-tell-if-wood-pallets-are-safe-for-crafting/
 

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I make tables from pallet wood all the time. However I try to avoid regular 48"x40" pine pallets. I try to find ones that are made from Oak or Ash or other woods. I work at a place that builds and installs commercial truck bodies. We get odd size and shape pallets all the time made of all kinds of wood.

I find regular pine pallets are hard to disassemble and it cracks easily.
 
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