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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Woodworkers,

This is only my second post. However I am on a quest to recreate a 50 year old wooden stand (pics included with this post). The stand looks quite simple and in some ways is. I have a friend in England who has one of these and has sent me tons of pics and dimensions, etc. I have been drawing up a full scale version of the stand on 1" scale large graph paper too. However, the more I draw the more I realize that the legs are very complex, they taper, have a rounded inner leg surface and a slightly beveled facing surface and they notch where they mount to the flat surface area. I'm really thinking that a CNC cut reproduction is the best way to go. The flat round surface (in black) is very simple the legs not so much.

This stand is part of an extremely rare mid-sixities piece of history that I am restoring so one way or another I have to find a way to get it done, and the work has to be well done and as the stand as close to the original as possible.

I don't know squat about CAD and using a computer to draw up these legs for recreating them. How do I begin? Are there individuals or companies I can (should I?) contact who will do this? If so who might be recommended? Or could I really do this myself?

Any assistance, recommendations and etc are really appreciated and will be taken quite seriously.

See pics.

Thanks!

B.S.
 

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Old School
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I would draw the stand in full size, not 1" scale. In full size, you can do one leg, and make it fit the drawing. Then use that leg to do the other two. You can use the brown or white wrapping paper that comes on a roll. It's 30" to 36" wide, plenty big to do it full size. It's sold in the stationery sections of drug stores, grocery stores, and office supply stores.

Take the leg one step at a time until you have featured it like the ones in the picture. Then it's up to the tools you have, and your skills.






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If you want to do CNC, I'd say take it to a professional company that will reproduce parts. I don't have any recommendations for specific companies, but someone else here might.

If you want to do it yourself, here are my thoughts. (These are pretty much off the top of my head; I reserve the right to change my mind later.)

1) It looks to me like the legs are a constant thickness, and only taper in width. That's good, because it simplifies things.

2) Start from gross structure to detail. That is, follow a process like this:
- Mark the blank (paying attention to grain direction), and cut the leg to shape. Leave the inner edge slightly oversized, but do cut the notch in the back.
- Then facet the outside: I'd use a hand plane or a spokeshave, but I don't like power tools. You might have good luck doing it with a router, though I'm not quite sure how.
- Once you're happy with that, round off the inside. While I really prefer hand tools, this is probably a job for a router table with a bullnose or roundover bit. A molding plane or a round plane would work well, but they're harder to get.


All in all, the legs don't look that complicated to me. A lot of end tables and the like have legs that are that complex, and people make them with hand or power tools all the time. My theory level is ahead of my skill level, but it still doesn't look that bad. If they are tapered in thickness as well as width, that would make it a little harder, but still not impossible. Some work with a hand plane or a bandsaw (or maybe a belt sander, if you're brave) would probably do the job.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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If it was built in the 60's....it wasn't made on a Cnc. I'd take one leg step by step and recreate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

Hey Cabinetman,

By one inch scale I meant that I'm drawing a full sized leg on 1" graph paper (I had to special order it). The paper is large and has a green grid of 1" lines. I did find it too hard to do on small standard graph paper.
Even drawing up this leg full sized on paper is difficult, but I'm working on it. I wish there was an easy way for a novice like me to do this in a CAD program.

The best thing about the stand is that once I have the leg drawn up that's basically it, as it needs three identical legs. The black circular area is very simple thankfully.

Amckenzie4,

Thank you too for your ideas on a process for creating the legs. Perhaps I should finish the drawings on the large graph paper completely and post those for you guys to see as well as the pictures.

Thanks you guys! I'll try to post more info.

B.S.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You're right!

If it was built in the 60's....it wasn't made on a Cnc. I'd take one leg step by step and recreate it.

There is no doubt about that! LOL The originals were built in approximately 1964. I suspect it was built by someone with some fine woodworking skills though. Not a guy like me with basically no fine woodworking experience.

I'm just concerned about getting an end result that is very professional in quality and also is quite sturdy as it will hold about 110 pounds when loaded.

B.S.
 

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where's my table saw?
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you may be overthinking this

You gave no indication of your equipment or woodworking skills so....

The leg is a simple shape with edge profiling as you have described it:
Cutting out the shape to a slightly oversize piece and finishing it exactly to a pre-made pattern is a simple operation. Make the pattern using a bandsaw and finish it by sanding away all the saw marks. You only need to make 3 legs, if that many? So a pattern and a "flush trim" bit with a bearing to follow the pattern will trim out your identical pieces.
A rounded profile on the inside can be done with a "round over" bit in the router.
A chamfered edge can be done with a "chamfering" bit the same way or by hand using a block plane.

The expense of a CNC and shop time may be a shock. If you have the tools you may actually enjoy the challenge. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey all,

As far as tools I have basic power tools, no fancy table saws, router tables, etc. I don't have an original, I wish I did. I am going by photographs and extensive detailed measurements provided to me by a friend in the UK who does have one. I feel fortunate to have the information
that I have. I am in East Texas near Tyler. Also there is a small bit of tapering to the legs too. I will try to post better info later tonight.

Yeah, a CNC shop may be expensive, but will it cost more than me buying the various tools I might need to do it myself?

Thanks
 

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I would get an angle finder gauge like the one in this link http://www.harborfreight.com/dial-gauge-angle-finder-34214.html

With it, you will be able to find the joining angle of the top edge to the cylinder and the angle of the slant of the leg to the floor on the top side and under side. This tool will give you pretty much all the angle information you need, then just get the length measurements and work them into your drawing. You don't need CAD for this project, just a good good 3-D eye and how to put things onto 2-D paper.

You can find the angle tool at Home Depot and most other lumber or hardware stores.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have the top

Thanks guys. Let me look into that angle finder thing that may be very helpful.

Frank C.

The spun copper components that go on the stand I have already, I'm just trying to recreate the stand. Without a stand the other parts are not usable. I could create a variety of stand designs that would work to support the upper portion of this lamp (it's a lamp) but I want it to look like the original type stand.

Thanks so much! You guys are so helpful to a newbie like me!

B.S.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What tools?

Hello again guys,

I'm still contemplating this stand issue. I did go to get a angle finder yesterday...out of stock of course so have to wait or check another store.

I am curious to know from you guys who are experienced woodworkers and would have no trouble making a very professional copy of this stand.

What tools precisely would I need to make this stand myself? Obviously I will need to be able to cut perfect circles for the round black part of the stand. But for the legs too what tools would it take for me to pull this off well?

Thank you!

B.S.
 

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where's my table saw?
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pretty much explains it here

You gave no indication of your equipment or woodworking skills so....

The leg is a simple shape with edge profiling as you have described it:
Cutting out the shape to a slightly oversize piece and finishing it exactly to a pre-made pattern is a simple operation. Make the pattern using a bandsaw and finish it by sanding away all the saw marks. You only need to make 3 legs, if that many? So a pattern and a "flush trim" bit with a bearing in a router to follow the pattern will trim out your identical pieces.
A rounded profile on the inside can be done with a "round over" bit in the router.
A chamfered edge can be done with a "chamfering" bit the same way or by hand using a block plane. :blink:
If you don't have a bandsaw, then a saber saw will work. I would not use a scroll saw, but as a last resort to cut the curves on the round parts.
For a fully equipped shop, it would be a no brainer, but as you reduce the power tools you increase the hand work.

Really, I would contract it out or find a buddy with a shop. You may find someone here to help or do the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Woodnthings

Thanks for your reply. What would buying the tools cost vs. hiring someone to create the pieces cost? To me if I had to pay someone an amount in the range of buying the tools and get a great, professional result that is a no brainer. I'd hire it done. I can do the finish work staining and clear coating…..I'm practiced and skilled at that type of thing.

This recreated stand is for an EXTREMELY rare and somewhat historic piece of Mid-Century ingenuity and design. I don't want to disclose exactly what the item is just yet but when I'm done with the stand and the restoration of the metal/electrical components of the lamp I'll show the finished piece.

Thanks again!

B.S.
 

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Scotty D
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Just buying the tools that WOULD do it, doesn't guarantee you Could do it. You may have to develop your experience/skill level first. If you had a detailed/dimensioned drawing, I would be glad to quote you a price on these pieces. The only other way is to have the pieces in hand. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Mdntrdr.....

Hey,

I am working on some drawings based on information sent to me by a guy who has one of these stands. I have dozens of pics with dimensions to work with. I just bought some styrofoam sheets to see if I have the rough dimensions correct.....by making a styrofoam mock up.

I will be able to you PM you some very detailed info in a week or two.

B.S.
 

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Scotty D
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Hey,

I am working on some drawings based on information sent to me by a guy who has one of these stands. I have dozens of pics with dimensions to work with. I just bought some styrofoam sheets to see if I have the rough dimensions correct.....by making a styrofoam mock up.

I will be able to you PM you some very detailed info in a week or two.

B.S.
Sounds great! If you don't have enough posts to PM me, you can find my e-mail on my website. :smile:
 

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As to what the tools would cost, there are two options. If you want to go power tools, you need, at a minimum, a bandsaw and a sander. Call it $300 to get quality tools, minimum, and more likely in the $500-600 range. Add in some material to make jigs out of, sandpaper, a couple of good blades, and other odds and ends, and you can assume it will be $600 or more. Then, spend a few weeks working full time to get the hang of all the things you need to do.

With hand tools, the tools are cheaper. Based on prices I've paid, call it around $25 for two panel saws, another $25 for a coping saw and some good blades, and probably another $25 for a decent chisel. $50 total should get you the hand planes necessary. Now spend a year or more learning to use them. I've been learning off and on for a year or so, and I'm not convinced I could make a perfect duplicate in one try; you might learn faster and be more dedicated than I am, though.
 
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