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Hey all!
I want to start woodworking again (I took ww in jr high and high school). I'm not wanting to build anything extravagant, just coffee table, end tables, vanity desk for wife. You get the idea. I'm pretty handy around the house and can easily do brake jobs and recently replaced the thermostat, front bearings and u joint on my 4x4 Ram.

Right now I have a Skil circular saw that's about 15-20 years old, a Craftsman cordless drill, a Dremel, and a bunch of mechanic tools. So I'm pretty sure I'll need a miter saw and table saw to start, along with clamps, glue, screws, impact drill, etc.

My head is spinning with my miter saw choices. I want to K.I.S.S. and looking at Steve Ramsey's The Weekend Woodworker course, he recommends a Ryobi 10" compound miter saw Model #TS1346. I watched his free video on building a workbench and he used the miter saw and impact drill. Pretty basic stuff and the entry point is about $140. Since we just moved into a house, a workbench is very high on my list of must-have items! 馃槃

Can anyone shed light on entry level miter saw brands? Ryobi or Metabo HPT? Both are around $140(ish) and both have high ratings on Lowes and HD. I'm also not opposed to Harbor Freight since they have a no questions asked return policy with their extended warranties and their power tools have solid reviews too. Does Lowes or HD have a decent warranties like HF?

Thanks in advance for your help! Much appreciated!
 

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I can鈥檛 speak to the current (green) generation of Ryobi saws but I started my wood working again years ago and bought one of the previous generation (blue) sliding miter saws. I was thinking it would do everything I needed and at the time I was happy with the ryobi (green) cordless set I had and it had good reviews.

Overall the saw wasn鈥檛 terrible and it got the job done as long as I checked the angles every time I set up for a new cut. I found it liked to drift and the indexing for both tilt and miter were constantly shifting out of alignment. Eventually I got irritated with it enough that wife broke down and bought me a dewalt for Xmas one year. I turned around and sold the ryobi to a friend who still uses it for his house building projects (molding and the like) but agrees it鈥檚 not accurate enough for fine detail work.

If I was doing it now I鈥檇 look closely at the Ridgid stuff instead. Their warranty is amazing and they stand by it. (LIfetime Service Agreement offered on some tools and that includes free replacement of batteries).

All that being said, depending on your needs, a good quality table saw will do a lot of what a miter saw will do. I鈥檇 recommend going after a good quality table saw first and save the miter for later. Pretty easy to use a decent guage, sled or jig to make miter cuts on a table saw but no way to do rip cuts on a miter saw.

Also, don鈥檛 discount the used market. Lots of great vintage tools out there to be had on the cheap that will far out perform modern stamped sheet metal and plastic models.

Just my 2c, hope it helps.
 

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Mechanic's skills and tools are a big plus when getting into wood working.

What budget do you have in mind? I see you are in the Houston Texas area. Are you good at finding used equipment? That can save you $$$$ on stuff like table saws, band saws, planers etc.

My 10" non-sliding miter saw is a Hitachi, I got it just before they changed to the Metabo name, it is the only one I've used, I think it is good for it's price point.

Personally I haven't bought used wood tools, I know from other categories of used stuff I'm not very good at shopping etc for it. I buy a range of qualities in tools, low end on up to the nicer stuff. A bench belt sander is one of my most useful tools, mine is a different brand of this: https://www.amazon.com/WEN-6502T-4-3-Amp-Belt-Sander/dp/B07KL4QGSQ/
Almost junk but it works, with some modification I like it, it is good for it's price point. A lot of the low end tools you will see the same thing sold by different brands, just different paint and a few details.

But for something like routers, table saws etc were precission, safety, durability count I like to buy better tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What budget do you have in mind? I see you are in the Houston Texas area. Are you good at finding used equipment? That can save you $$$$ on stuff like table saws, band saws, planers etc.
Thanks for your reply @Bob Bengal - yes, NW Houston area and I spend waaayyy too much time looking on CL and FB Marketplace for used tools. 馃槀 Since my budget is entry level (sub $200), those used tools are roughly the same price as new.
 

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...shed light on miter saw (stuff) . . .

I'm likely in a serious minority here.....but in my world, miter saws - sliding or other - are simple replacements for a hand saw, to reduce long stuff to shorter stuff.

the real accuracy is a table saw + sleds + long armed miter gauges.

now....it is absolutely truth that craftsman - like kitchen cabinet guys & crown molding guys - use miter saw with exquisite success. they have the experience to see/recognize/tweak settings. for the usual one-off stuff I do, I need more engineered solutions.
 

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I think I've had good results getting accuracy from my 10" non-slider. Like 30 parallelograms about .75 x 2.5 x 6 for cat stairs etc. For that I like it better than my TS crosscut sled.

If I want to cut one piece of a 2x4 accurately I mark it with a knife and with the power off bring the miter blade down until a tooth on that side touches the line.

Personal preference, work style, needs etc.
 

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I bought the 10" Ryobi miter saw back in December, have used the heck out of it over the past few months and I love it. I put a Diablo blade in mine and its awesome.
I was actually torn between the Ryobi and the Metabo HPT and went with the Ryobi because it was a bit less expensive and because at the time, I was much more familiar with Ryobi as a brand.
Since then, Ive bought a Metabo 3/8" corded drill and 7 1/4" circular saw, so now I know that Metabo is awesome and kick of kick myself for not getting the Metabo miter saw but I do love my Ryobi.
IMO, both are great.
 

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Hey all!
I want to start woodworking again (I took ww in jr high and high school). I'm not wanting to build anything extravagant, just coffee table, end tables, vanity desk for wife. You get the idea. I'm pretty handy around the house and can easily do brake jobs and recently replaced the thermostat, front bearings and u joint on my 4x4 Ram.

Right now I have a Skil circular saw that's about 15-20 years old, a Craftsman cordless drill, a Dremel, and a bunch of mechanic tools. So I'm pretty sure I'll need a miter saw and table saw to start, along with clamps, glue, screws, impact drill, etc.

My head is spinning with my miter saw choices. I want to K.I.S.S. and looking at Steve Ramsey's The Weekend Woodworker course, he recommends a Ryobi 10" compound miter saw Model #TS1346. I watched his free video on building a workbench and he used the miter saw and impact drill. Pretty basic stuff and the entry point is about $140. Since we just moved into a house, a workbench is very high on my list of must-have items! 馃槃

Can anyone shed light on entry level miter saw brands? Ryobi or Metabo HPT? Both are around $140(ish) and both have high ratings on Lowes and HD. I'm also not opposed to Harbor Freight since they have a no questions asked return policy with their extended warranties and their power tools have solid reviews too. Does Lowes or HD have a decent warranties like HF?

Thanks in advance for your help! Much appreciated!
Metabo is owned by Hitachi. The only other tool made by Hitachi is Hitachi. Hitachi invented the sliding compound saw years ago with their 8-1/2" sliding compound. Had one for over 20 years, it was a beast. Ryobi is owned by TTI. TTI owns about 11 companies, from crap companies like Dirt Devil, to standup Milwaukee Tool. You could also consider purchasing a used saw. I see some on Facebook Marketplace for great prices, hardly used. Makita. Dewalt would be ones you may want to look at used.
 

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Ryobi isn't actually owned by TTI, they merely have the license to produce tools under the Ryobi name. Ryobi is actually owned by Kyocera.
Imo, both are quality saws. My Ryobi miter saw is a beast.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Also, don鈥檛 discount the used market. Lots of great vintage tools out there to be had on the cheap that will far out perform modern stamped sheet metal and plastic models.
I agree. I have some tools that I never would have considered buying (high cost) but because they were used were actually very affordable. Some were bought by DIYers who didn't care about price, had to have the best and then hardly used them.
 

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I would look Craigslist or marketplace for a Dewalt 705 or 706. You find some in really good shape and then your done looking...
 

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I would look at Facebook or Craigslist. If you鈥檙e not in a hurry, go to dealnews.com, have an alert for sliding miter saw. Box stores sometimes have incredible sales on power tools. Dealnews.com gave me an alert on a dewalt 12鈥 sliding miter with rolling stand for $360. This was the none laser version. The saw by itself was $400 and the rolling stand is $230.
 

where's my table saw?
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I own mulitple saws of all different types, so I have a choice of which one to use for each specific task.
Here's my "Rule of Thumb":
For long and or heavy pieces, bring the saw to the work.
For lighter, smaller pieces, bring them to the saw.
For crosscutting longer pieces I like to use a RAS set at 90 degrees. For smaller pieces, I'll use my miter gauge with an extended fence and a stop clamped to it.
For ripping planks and sheet goods I'll use my table saw with the outfeed extension and side supports.
Of course the construction site will dictate which tool you CAN use. Building sites will have a sliding miter saw or a chop saw and no RAS or table saw. Tools usually go back into the van at the end of the day at the job site, unless they can be secured inside.
 
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