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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I needed to notch two 2x4s at both ends today. I thought about getting out the dado blades and spending the time to set them up, and then taking to time to make the several passes I would need, and then breaking the dado back down again.

Then I thought, it would be a LOT easier and faster to set the boards on end and making the deep cut that way. Only problem would be holding the vertical boards steady while the 2x4x48s passed over the saw blade evenly without twisting or falling over might be a problem.

I could make a jig to hold the wood as I made the pass, but if I was going to do that, I might as well take the dado set out.

Then it came to me that I could just position the board over the blade, secure it to the fence, and raise the blade into the wood to do the cut.

It took me only a couple minutes to set up this "quick jig" to hold the board to the fence and the cuts were made. I was able to was able to easily hold the board steady from the safe side of the fence (the blade spinning on one side and my hand on the other side of the fence).

The blade raised without binding or slowing and I stopped it when it reached the summit. After turning off the motor, the blade spun on as if there was no wood there - in other words freely.

Here is my question...

Is this a "legitimate" way to use the table? Or was this a potential safety problem that I "got away with?"

I searched the net before and after I did this; if this was indeed a safety problem, please explain.
 

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It's not the safest thing to do but if you would put the piece you are cutting off on the outside of the blade instead of between the blade and fence it would be better. The biggest risk is having the saw throw the block of wood at you. Another option would be to screw a wide piece of plywood on a miter gauge and clamp the board to it.
 

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In the time it took to search the web...you could have cut it with a hand saw, and pared to perfection. Besides, practice makes perfect.
 

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I've done it a few times but don't recommend it on a normal basis. Come to think of it, I think I did it on a sheet of plywood a couple of times so it's a bit different.

David
Same here, more sheet, or flat cuts, up on the end is a little different. Looks like it worked though so all is good, just make sure to take all the precautions you can to keep if from shooting back at you. I would have likely put a stop block behind it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
It's not the safest thing to do but if you would put the piece you are cutting off on the outside of the blade instead of between the blade and fence it would be better. The biggest risk is having the saw throw the block of wood at you. Another option would be to screw a wide piece of plywood on a miter gauge and clamp the board to it.
I've done it a few times but don't recommend it on a normal basis. Come to think of it, I think I did it on a sheet of plywood a couple of times so it's a bit different.

David
Same here, more sheet, or flat cuts, up on the end is a little different. Looks like it worked though so all is good, just make sure to take all the precautions you can to keep if from shooting back at you. I would have likely put a stop block behind it.
So, I take it none of you have a concern with the saw blade being raised into the wood, just the bracing method.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's not the safest thing to do but if you would put the piece you are cutting off on the outside of the blade instead of between the blade and fence it would be better. The biggest risk is having the saw throw the block of wood at you. Another option would be to screw a wide piece of plywood on a miter gauge and clamp the board to it.
So, you are suggesting that there be more "meat" between the blade and the fence... I aways thought that was something to be avoided.

Anyway, on the 3rd and 4th cuts (the other end) that is what I ended up doing; it may have felt a little more stable while I was holding it - but I cannot be certain of that.
 

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Not me ...

I would never raise the blade under power into a workpiece that was not totally secured down. Things can go wrong in a heartbeat. A far better choice would be a bandsaw or and handsaw. If it's necessary to use this method, turn the workpiece so the cut off falls away and is not trapped between the blade and the fence where it can twist and get kickbacked.
This is what Steve is recommending.

Another approach is to leave the pieces flat on the table, raise the blade to it's highest and make one partial cut from each side, using the fence. You will still need to saw the small connecting portion away, but the faces will be very accurate. This is what I would do. :vs_cool:
 
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So, you are suggesting that there be more "meat" between the blade and the fence... I aways thought that was something to be avoided.

Anyway, on the 3rd and 4th cuts (the other end) that is what I ended up doing; it may have felt a little more stable while I was holding it - but I cannot be certain of that.
What I was trying to say is put this part of the wood between the fence and the blade. You could then clamp a board to the fence behind the part before you raise the blade up into it. Then the loose piece of scrap wouldn't be between the fence and blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What I was trying to say is put this part of the wood between the fence and the blade. You could then clamp a board to the fence behind the part before you raise the blade up into it. Then the loose piece of scrap wouldn't be between the fence and blade.
OK, gotcha... Thanks for taking the time to explain.
 
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