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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of purchasing a radial arm saw... This guy has this saw and says it is in good working order. He is willing to trade for my nintendo wii setup that I have and never use.

http://anchorage.craigslist.org/tls/4262801874.html

Its the old AMF series...

I was thinking of buying it to use for crosscutting and dadoes. More than likely just dado cuts.

Any advice would be appreciated. I know they can be dangerous with climb cutting etc.
 

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good value @ $100. negative hook blade for CCing and pass on any opportunites to use it for ripping. i ripped on mine once or twice, and i won't do it again.
 
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That model sells for between $250 - $350 around here. It's a good saw. Since there is no fence on that saw and it needs a table, I would not try any test cuts. Test out all the adjustments, lock the carriage to the arm and listen to the motor and coast down. Saw should start quickly and run quietly. I suppose you really felt the need, you could clamp on a fence just be careful and make a couple of crosscuts.. Good luck. (The model that came after this one was not as good.)
 

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I use nothing but a RAS and have no problems with it. I even do ripping and while I do understand why many folks recommend against it, if done properly (with a featherboard) it's not really a problem at all. Certainly crosscuts and dado cuts are no problem, with the right blade.
 

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If it runs smooth, get it. I've used one for 42 years now. A table saw is worth getting too. I only use the RAS for accurate right angle crosscuts. If you set it up for precise, no tearout, accurate crosscuts, it's too hard to get it back after changing it to some other function, even with the high dollar ones.
 

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Hmmm lets see: an older model gaming system with many balloony type kids games that are not as good as a ps or xbox thats made in china, or a vintage Dewalt radial arm saw that can be tuned up and get a heck of alot of use as well as save shop time thats made in the USA........
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a compound miter saw already for angle cuts, a circular saw, and jig saw. I talked to the wife and she doesn't want me losing a finger on the radial saw. She said for my birthday here in a few days I can just buy a table saw.

:)
 

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I have a compound miter saw already for angle cuts, a circular saw, and jig saw. I talked to the wife and she doesn't want me losing a finger on the radial saw. She said for my birthday here in a few days I can just buy a table saw.

:)
Google "table saw injuries". Scary.

I've used a radial arm saw since 1975 and consider it the safest saw in my shop (an older Craftsman). Keep fingers out of way and keep the work piece up against the fence and no problem.
 

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Any advice would be appreciated. I know they can be dangerous with climb cutting etc.
Dangerous??? Not really. Not any more than operating an electric drill, and boring a hole in your hand. Or, sticking a screwdriver in your eye. Knowing how to use the tools makes them worthwhile. A RAS may SEEM to be aggressive, but with a proper blade, and user control, the saw is very easy to operate.

I've always had at least two around...one for just 90° crosscuts, and one for angles. The saw you posted is a good deal, and will likely serve you well. IMO, a table saw would be the center of the shop, unless all you are doing is nipping off 2x4's all day long.





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Another YES for that particular saw. No more dangerous than any of the other finger eating tools in a typical woodshop. Should you decide to get that (sounds like you aren't interested) PM me for some info on rebuilding and tuning that model saw. I have a couple of PDF files I can e-mail that make that saw a dead nuts performer.
 

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get it for the trade factor!

I was thinking of purchasing a radial arm saw... This guy has this saw and says it is in good working order. He is willing to trade for my nintendo wii setup that I have and never use.

http://anchorage.craigslist.org/tls/4262801874.html

Its the old AMF series...

I was thinking of buying it to use for crosscutting and dadoes. More than likely just dado cuts.

Any advice would be appreciated. I know they can be dangerous with climb cutting etc.
It's worth way more than a game set you don't use.
It's also one of the better ones... see posts above.
Now as to safety, same as with all the other power tools, learn the rules and operating procedures for that type of machine. :yes:

Replace the blade with a RAS blade which will have a negative tooth angle to avoid what you called, "climbing" not really the correct. It will tend to "self feed" if you don't have the correct blade, but it won't climb over the workpiece.

What can yo do on it?
Crosscutting on a RAS is the best and most accurate way to shorten boards and get 90 degree ends. Try a 10 ft board on a table table with a miter guage and you'll know what I mean. Table saws are better for ripping boards to width and have a "rip" fence as part of the machine.

I use a 12" RAS which is always set to 90 degrees for most of my cross cutting, even smaller pieces, but you need to hold them securely against the fence/back stop. Some models hold their angle and 90 degree settings better than others and the one you posted is a good one, so I'd get it regardless of your short term needs. Long term it will be a great tool for you, trust me I have several. I have used them for cutting off boards to length, dados, miters, and yes even ripping. :eek:

The entire issue of ripping on a RAS is subject to much debate and I will just say you need to understand how the physics of the blade rotating upward works and use the nose of the blade guard to hold the work to the table surface and then it's a pretty safe operation for boards that are not too narrow. A whole bunch of cautions apply, but not in this post. :no:

I'd get it! :thumbsup:
 
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Dangerous??? Not really. Not any more than operating an electric drill, and boring a hole in your hand. Or, sticking a screwdriver in your eye.
It's the screwdriver in the eye that gets me every time. Can't seem to get the hang of the technique.

That RAS would make for a great restore project; I'd get it in a heartbeat let alone trade it for a WII. Available shop space should be more of a concern than the danger factor.
 

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Older machines can't be priced consistently. I'm not sure about your area, but around here(Kentucky), 100 would be a fair price. I got line a bit cheaper, but I've also seen them for around 400. It's a crapshoot, and it comes down to you. Do you need it? I did, and I would have paid a little more if I had to. Do you have space for it? RAS's are big. They're hulking machines with a large footprint, and restoration, or at least maintainance is NOT a small task. These things have loads of moving parts, and they have to be tuned PERFECTLY to operate smoothly. If you are familiar with RAS's, I would snatch it up. The OEM paint looks good, and the Dewalt RAS is a great machine. I say go for it.

Cam
 

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In my book that is a steal, I had a 16 inch Dewalt made in 1957 and it is still running just as smooth as it did years ago. If I had room in my small shop I would still have it. They are tough to set up but once set they stay that way unless moved to another location.
 

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That's a good ras.
I wouldn't hesitate moving the arm for angle cuts. If you can use a square, it shouldn't take, a few test cuts, and moving the arm, between cuts, to get it back to 90. Do it all the time on my ras. And mine doesn't have a 90 deg. detent. No big deal.
Be sure the ways, that the carriage rides on, aren't worn. They usually wear, close to the post, where most cuts are made.
Good luck with it. Read up on all the adjustments, and set it up properly, and it should be a pleasure to use.
Not sure about that Dewalt, but my Red Star, had socket head set screws for adjustments, and a second set screw, on top of the first one to lock it in.
 
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