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Discussion Starter #1
I currently have the RIDGID R4512 and recently installed my new Forrest Woodworker II 3/32" thin kerf blade. The issue I'm having now is that the riving knife that comes with the Ridgid is now wider than my new blade, and thus not able to be used.

I don't feel comfortable making rip cuts without the knife in, and I'm kind of at a loss on how to move forward. I am also using the Leecraft ZCI which comes with a slot in the back for the stock riving knife to travel through. This was great when using my other blades, but now prevents me from using one of those aftermarket glue in pieces.

Here are the options I am exploring, but I would also appreciate any other ideas y'all might have.

1) Glue a piece of sandpaper to a machined flat surface (such as my TS top) and then sand both sides of the stock riving knife until it is thin enough to work with my new blade.
- This however will leave bare steel that will rust unless I repaint it, subsequently increasing the width again and most likely making it uneven.

2) Experiment with making my own ZCI, and then use an aftermarket glue in piece.
- This also presents a problem because it probably won't work with my TS sled, and it won't travel with the blade like the stock one does.

Hopefully someone out there has experienced the same problem, and may have some useful advice. Maybe I'm over thinking this a little, but I don't want to start cutting corners when it comes to safety.

Thank you in advance.

- Sean
 

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I too have that saw, I rip oak quite often and never use the knife. We have never used one on a job site so I don't now. But if you sand it down to fit, then lightly coated it with wax or WD 40, you wouldn't be gaining the thickness back. Just have to wipe it down before use.
 

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I have a Delta Unisaw and was able to purchase a narrower riving knife for the thin kerf blades.

If you do elect to sand down the present riving knife ONLY sand the fence side of the riving knife. The arbor side needs to be left alone since both normal and thin kerf blades contact the arbor side the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a Delta Unisaw and was able to purchase a narrower riving knife for the thin kerf blades.

If you do elect to sand down the present riving knife ONLY sand the fence side of the riving knife. The arbor side needs to be left alone since both normal and thin kerf blades contact the arbor side the same.
Dave, thank you very much! I never would have thought about that when I went to sand it. It makes sense that only one side would need adjusting. I will look in to aftermarket riving knives for thin kerf blades, but I'm curious as to where I should look. Was the one for your Delta made by the manufacturer or another company?

Thanks again. - Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did a quick search and came up with this website that sells aftermarket riving knives. The only problem is that the smallest one they sell for my saw is .090 and my blade is .09375. In the text at the top of the website page, they say not to get a riving knife close to the thickness of the blade, but I don't know what they would consider "close". They also state that the knives are then powder-coated which adds a minimal amount to each side. Thoughts on whether this would work for me?
 

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Here's my 2 cents worth: pull out your current knife and take it to your local high school welding teacher and have his students make a custom knife the thickness that you need. That's what they do: cut, grind, bend, weld, and paint different types of metal. Our advanced shop kids even weld aluminum, which is very hard to weld well. I'm sure they could make you just what you want.

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Discussion Starter #7
Here's my 2 cents worth: pull out your current knife and take it to your local high school welding teacher and have his students make a custom knife the thickness that you need. That's what they do: cut, grind, bend, weld, and paint different types of metal. Our advanced shop kids even weld aluminum, which is very hard to weld well. I'm sure they could make you just what you want.

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That's a really good idea. I actually know the guy who teaches that class at the local high school. I was just reading a couple other things online where guys said they went to the local scrap yard and picked up some stainless or aluminum plate in I think 14 gauge, and made their own from that. I like the idea of having a shop class do it though. Thanks!
 
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