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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know what kind of glue/adhesive the commercial door companies use? Can't they glue up a raised panel and let it sit in the clamps for 10-15 minutes and finish machining them?
I'm looking for something that I can glue up stock and be able to machine it in about an hour. That way when I get done gluing up my doors (usually do my doors last so I might have 10-20 to do at the same time) I can start working on the first panels, or start finishing the actual doors.
Anything to speed myself up.
I usually only have about 6 hours per week to work in the shop so time is precious.

But it can't screw up the finishing process.

Any ideas?

What do you guys do? These aren't doors for fine furniture, just cabinet doors, but they still have to look good or I'm just wasting time... :)
 

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Alot of production companies us RF glue driers............ I know the Furniture company O spent 5 years at did.. Veneer layup, Top edging and in the Chir factory side as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe I shouldn't be so impatient... :laughing:

I was told Gorilla Glue worked well and could be used in 1-4 hours.

Anyone have any experience with it?

Will it cause problems with a stained & laquered finish?
 

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I don't care for it myself. Yellow carpenters glue can generally be worked in the same amount of time and it doesn't foam up out of the joints if you use a little too much. As for interfering with stains or clear finishes, any glue left on the surface will blotch the finish. Any of the polyurethane glues are far more likely to end up on the surface because of the foaming out.
 

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the foaming will require cleanup if you don't mind doing that, then by all means try it. I've used it on some "hard to glue" woods you know the oily African stuff........ after 2 years now the butt joint is still holding strong
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have used the Molding & Trim Glue, I tried to use it last night actually, I left it in the truck and it froze :thumbdown: and it is toast, so I have it on my shopping list for my next trip to the box store.

I have 9 raised panel doors to make and I will be posting my pictures of my wifes walk in closet (9'x12').

N
 

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glueing up panels

Hey Nate,
I realize you are long done with the initial project you posted about, but maybe this will help in the future. I was making up some blanks for raised panels the other day and did not want to wait on them. I used my Kreg jig and drilled the backside of one of the two pieces of wood used to make up the panel. Four screws. I like titebond three for my lathe projects so I use it on just about everything. I used some glue and the screws and after wiping off the squeeze out with a damp rag, I could immediately machine the panels. The only thing you have to have from Kreg is a pair of their large throat vice grip style clamp to clamp the pieces together while tightening each screw. Their was no distortion of the panels sometimes brought on by clamp pressure in a traditional glue-up method. If you don't want to see the oval slots left by the pocket holes, you can always plug them and sand flush. I am using these panels on a couple of vanities and don't mind not plugging them.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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about gorilla glue

one of the Polyurethane based glues.

Neat stuff. Excellent filling characteristics. Bonds a wide variety of materials. Works well for outdoor projects. Cures well in damp environments. Produces a strong weather resistant bond.

Cons:

When it cures, it "foams" to fill any voids to maximize the bond. This "foam" will squeeze out of the joint and becomes something to be dealt with. Before it is cured, the glue is really sticky and difficult to remove. Once cured, it is still something to be dealt with. The foam that is squeezed out of the joint is somewhat difficult to remove. On my outdoor projects, I don't bother where the squeeze-out is concealed. It must be noted that this squeeze-out forms a skin over the interior of the joint and thus, potentially, some additional protection for the joint.

Note, that if the glue is put on too liberally, the foaming action could actually push the joint apart. Make sure it is securely clamped and don't skimp on the clamps.
 
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