Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting started into woodworking and admit I have little knowledge. I am trying to get outfitted with the bread and butter tools to do some fun projects. My projects will be greatly varied--everything from cabinets to furniture to boats to toys. I know each of those requires specialized tools but right now I'm trying to get tools that will be versatile for many projects and the "bread and butter" of the shop.

Currently I have a few items--Festool Kapex Miter, Festool jig saw, Ridgid cordless power tools, several Dremel tools and accessories, and a SawStop table saw on the way. I am blessed to have the means to buy quality products and as you can tell from the Festool and SawStop I don't hesitate to do so when I feel there is a benefit to the price increase.

I have research sanders but found very little information. What do most people have in their shop for sanding? I'm not looking for a one dimensional product, but rather something that can be versatile and handle a variety of tasks. As I need specialized equipment, I will buy it.

Do people use belt sanders? One guy I made some chairs with that is all he used. It worked fine, but I hear very little discussion on woodworking sites about sanders at all and especially very little about belt sanders.

I have been looking at the Festool Rotex sander. Yes, pricey, but does provide multiple functions and is a quality handheld sander.

I would very much appreciate input from folks on sanders. I learn much from you guys and appreciate your help. If you have any links to webpages that may give me good general information about what sanders are used for what tasks that would be appreciated as well. I'm sort of overwhelmed getting started and am looking for some starting points to do my research.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
A belt sander can get away from you if you're inexperienced. Get yourself a 1/3 or 1/2 sheet sander. Looks like you like quality:thumbsup:. Try Metabo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
I'd say all you need is an ROS, add to that later if you want. Since I got one, my other sanders have all sat unused....including the belt sanders. Get the Festool if you want, but there are several lower priced quality ROS available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I am getting started into woodworking and admit I have little knowledge. I am trying to get outfitted with the bread and butter tools to do some fun projects. My projects will be greatly varied--everything from cabinets to furniture to boats to toys. I know each of those requires specialized tools but right now I'm trying to get tools that will be versatile for many projects and the "bread and butter" of the shop.

Currently I have a few items--Festool Kapex Miter, Festool jig saw, Ridgid cordless power tools, several Dremel tools and accessories, and a SawStop table saw on the way. I am blessed to have the means to buy quality products and as you can tell from the Festool and SawStop I don't hesitate to do so when I feel there is a benefit to the price increase.

I have research sanders but found very little information. What do most people have in their shop for sanding? I'm not looking for a one dimensional product, but rather something that can be versatile and handle a variety of tasks. As I need specialized equipment, I will buy it.

Do people use belt sanders? One guy I made some chairs with that is all he used. It worked fine, but I hear very little discussion on woodworking sites about sanders at all and especially very little about belt sanders.

I have been looking at the Festool Rotex sander. Yes, pricey, but does provide multiple functions and is a quality handheld sander.

I would very much appreciate input from folks on sanders. I learn much from you guys and appreciate your help. If you have any links to webpages that may give me good general information about what sanders are used for what tasks that would be appreciated as well. I'm sort of overwhelmed getting started and am looking for some starting points to do my research.

Thanks!
i have these 3 sander's and those will sand anything i want, 2 are porter cable a 3x21 and a 4x24, and a 6" RIDGID ROS, life tme warrenty, those work for me , i don't like the 1/4 sheet type had one and gave it away didn't work for me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,647 Posts
I don't see how anyone can do woodworking without a belt sander. Sure it takes some practice but so does everything else. I've worn out 4 porter cable 361 belt sanders and don't like the way they re-invented them so I'm currently using harbor freight 3x21 sanders. They sand pretty good but the belt tends to drift around if you put any real pressure on it but you really shouldn't be leaning on them anyway. They are only 30 bucks so you can't complain much. I keep one in the shop and keep another on my work truck. The belt sander is good to remove the mill marks created by a jointer or planer. Also if you glue up wood they are really handy sanding the panels flat. Once the mill marks are sanded out another sander I like to use is a random orbital sander. They are good to finish the job of sanding removing the scratches made by the belt sander and bringing the wood to a condition fit for finishing.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
I've never had a hand held belt sander in my shop. I take my panels in for sanding on a wide belt sander....

So now I'm intrigued.....how close to perfect flat can you get a large panel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
Taking a board from planer to a hand held belt sander, seems counterintuitive. After my planer, I just do light sanding.

FYI, for those who haven't used one, a belt sander can do real damage, real quick. Not real sure it has a place in a woodworking shop.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
It all depends on what type of work you want to do. Personally, I use all my sanders. I like my PC 361 belt sanders, I have a 3x24, and a 4x24. I use the 3x24 more often. I have worn out the metal platen several times, and have replaced the cork and brushes several times. I've used them for over 30 years. Found them better than other brands.

I use several brands of random orbit sanders (5", 8 hole), and two sizes of finish sanders. I use an electric D/A, and an air D/A. I use an air file (straightline sander). For airtools I also use a jitterbug.

Other tools include a stationary belt/disk sander, oscillating spindle sander, 36" drum sander and a stroke sander. I have a multifunction tool, but haven't used the detail sanding attachment yet.





.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Ran across a list of tool definitions awhile back:

"Belt Sander: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs. " :laughing:


While there is a little more than an element of truth in that, I find a belt sander valuable in both woodworking and DIY repair. They are designed to remove a lot of stock very quickly and do a good job of it.
A Random Orbital Sander however, also is able to remove stock at a pretty fair rate and is a little more manageable and versatile. Given your description of your situation and that you seem to have the resources for the high end tools, I would recommend go ahead with the Rotex. If you find you need a belt sander, you can always pick up one of those. I'm a proponent of letting the project dictate tool purchases.:yes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for those responses. They were very education and informative to a novice. I think I'm going to go ahead and get the Rotex. As Festool advertises, it really is 3 different tools in one so I think that at least partially justifies the cost. Sounds like that should do most thing I need and as I need other functions, I can pick up specific tools. Thanks!
 

·
Really underground garage
Joined
·
2,552 Posts
Semantics again.......

Don't call it a "sander".....because they have very limited uses when applied in that fashion.And one reason they get a bad rep.

Think of it as a portable "belt grinder" opens up a whole 'nuther world.If your wood shop profile is one that sees a steady flow of "this" product.....then they may or not fit in.BUT.....if you have a "job shop" where you may be making a repro case pce today and working on a wagon wheel tomorrow,well then.....no shop CAN be without one.

In the world of "onsite",really B.A. stairs....curved and other wise,they have no equal.They work especially well on curved,edge work.....when you left your big arse edge sanders back at the shop.Sanding all the nosers before "picket"(baluster's)install is imperative......whether yee be a floor sander or not.....it's just the "right thing to do".
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top