Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am in midst of refinishing a parquet, veneered table top - couple of questions for the experts out there:

small splits in veneer - do I use a wood putty? wood glue? to repair these - there are just a few from where water sat on the table during a party.

Is this walnut?

The table started as very dark and very glossy. I want it to have a more natural, buffed finish. ( you can see where I tested some dark wax - love the finish but not sure it is best finish option after ready several other threads on this forum). Is there a product you recommend that would accomplish this - I dont want to use a poly. and is there a product that woud help "fill" these small splits?

thanks!

dining table 1.jpg

dining table 3.jpg

dining table 4.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,158 Posts
The wood looks like Oak to me. Wood putty is going to look like wood putty because it will never accurately match the color or grain. If you're using a film finish, I'd use epoxy to fill the cracks because it takes on the color of the surrounding wood. However, epoxy will stand out like a sore thumb under an oil finish because it will be too glossy. I just used Mohawk Dead Flat lacquer on a small project and I was amazed at how good it looked. I used two coats of gloss followed by two coats of the dead flat. The flat looks hand rubbed and it really didn't obscure the grain. I used rattle cans which worked fine on what I was doing, but I'm not sure how they'd work on a table top.


You're going to need to get that wax off before you start finishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the info - much appreciated!

what is the reason for using gloss under the flat?

yes - big friday night plans to remove the wax :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,214 Posts
You are going about the refinishing project the wrong way. With wood always use a chemical paint and varnish remover first. Sanding tends to remove the finish on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it stains uneven because the wood is still sealed in spots.

The wood is ash or oak. You could use wood putty to fill the cracks however try to get a wood putty that is colored close to the color you are going to stain the table with it. A natural wood putty won't take enough stain to match the wood stain. If natural is all you can get go to a real paint store and buy a can and have them add some burnt umber tinting color to the putty so you can make it match the stain. The tinting color is the colorant they have in their machines to mix paint with. If the can is nearly full of putty you might have to throw a little of it away to make room for the colorant. Don't use glue or even sawdust mixed with glue because it will stain the wood to where you won't be able to stain it and would take more sanding than you have veneer to get under it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
@Steve Neul has got it right. I would like to add the following:

* Steve is right about matching the color of the wood filler with the finished product; it won't take stain well. I would add: If you are not sure about the match, choose one shade darker.

* My spouse is very good at using markers to draw grain patterns in the wood filler. It matches up and camouflages the wood putty very well. Try it on scrap first, until you get the hang of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,158 Posts
thanks for the info - much appreciated!

what is the reason for using gloss under the flat?

yes - big friday night plans to remove the wax :)


Flat finishes have an additive in it that makes it reflect light differently. When you build up too many coats of it, it begins to look muddy and obscure the view of the grain. That’s why it’s recommended to build up a couple of coats of gloss, then do the flat to get the look you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thanks! yes I did strip off the original varnish and stain and then carefully sanded smooth. and thansk for the tips on the wood putty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,214 Posts
thanks! yes I did strip off the original varnish and stain and then carefully sanded smooth. and thansk for the tips on the wood putty
Another thing you might consider it being veneered is to put some masking tape on each side of the crack when applying the putty. That would minimize the sanding.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top