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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on a mail holder, key holder and white board that will hang on our fridge.

I'm wanting to add magnets to this project so that it will hang on the fridge.

Since I intend to use thinner sections of wood my concern is using the rate earth magnets that glue may not hold and it may pull out of the glue when this is removed. The other concern I have is that using strip magnets may not be strong enough to hold this.

Anyone done a similar project that can offer advice?
 

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Not sure how thin you are talking about, but i have had great success using epoxy adhesive to glue neodymium magnets in place.
 

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John
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I'm working on a mail holder, key holder and white board that will hang on our fridge.

I'm wanting to add magnets to this project so that it will hang on the fridge.

Since I intend to use thinner sections of wood my concern is using the rate earth magnets that glue may not hold and it may pull out of the glue when this is removed. The other concern I have is that using strip magnets may not be strong enough to hold this.

Anyone done a similar project that can offer advice?
I've used magnets but not in that particular application. If I have an application where I'm concerned about the glue not holding the magnet, I use countersunk magnets with a screw. Not sure if that is an option for you as you say you want them in the thinner sections of wood. That could also be another issue as magnets typically get stronger in proportion to their thickness. I usually get my magnets from these guys and they include a wealth of technical info on their website
http://www.kjmagnetics.com/products.asp?cat=173
Good Luck:smile:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Test it out first

Get six of the magnets, line them up across in a straight line, and using a strip of wood press downward towards the floor. How much force does it take to move the entire line of magnets...? that will give you some idea of how strong the grip is. BTW, stainless steel is non-magnetic if I recall, magnets work work.

You should be able to bore holes for the magnets, epoxy them in a little proud of the surface,and they should stay put. How many you need depends on the results of your test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not sure how thin you are talking about, but i have had great success using epoxy adhesive to glue neodymium magnets in place.
I've had that happen on cheap ones the wife bought in the past. that's why I'm building one is because I'm tired of the cheap ones you buy at the store where they either don't stay up or the magnets are too strong and pull the glue out and stay stuck to the fridge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've used magnets but not in that particular application. If I have an application where I'm concerned about the glue not holding the magnet, I use countersunk magnets with a screw. Not sure if that is an option for you as you say you want them in the thinner sections of wood. That could also be another issue as magnets typically get stronger in proportion to their thickness. I usually get my magnets from these guys and they include a wealth of technical info on their website
http://www.kjmagnetics.com/products.asp?cat=173
Good Luck:smile:
Thanks for the site, great link.
 

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John
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Get six of the magnets, line them up across in a straight line, and using a strip of wood press downward towards the floor. How much force does it take to move the entire line of magnets...? that will give you some idea of how strong the grip is. BTW, stainless steel is non-magnetic if I recall, magnets work work.

You should be able to bore holes for the magnets, epoxy them in a little proud of the surface,and they should stay put. How many you need depends on the results of your test.
Boring holes through neodymium magnets is generally counterproductive. The things are harder than anything and HSS is a waste of bits. Cobalt might make it through them but the heat generated will likely kill the magnet before you're done. I think about 160°F is about all they can handle. :smile:
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I glued rare earth magnets into my tablesaw throat plate with titebond 2 and its been a year or more of use with no movement. I used a forestner bit and bored about 1/16 extra depth....leaving 1/16 around the magnet as well. Put a big squirt of glue in the hole...stuck the magnet in and pushed to the depth I wanted them. Wiped off what oozed out and let it dry for 24 hours.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Boring holes "for" not "through"

Get six of the magnets, line them up across in a straight line, and using a strip of wood press downward towards the floor. How much force does it take to move the entire line of magnets...? that will give you some idea of how strong the grip is. BTW, stainless steel is non-magnetic if I recall, magnets work work.

You should be able to bore holes for the magnets, epoxy them in a little proud of the surface,and they should stay put. How many you need depends on the results of your test.
Boring holes through neodymium magnets is generally counterproductive. The things are harder than anything and HSS is a waste of bits. Cobalt might make it through them but the heat generated will likely kill the magnet before you're done. I think about 160°F is about all they can handle. :smile:
I did NOT suggest boring holes through the magnets. :no:
 

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A good 2 part epoxy should be fine. I stuck a couple of earth magnets to the back of one of my metal tool boxes so I could hang a 2' square. I use the square pretty often, and the magnets haven't moved yet.
 
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