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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I'm new to woodworking and am in the process of getting my shop set up. Just finished installing the Incra TS/LS fence system on my old table saw (woohoo!), finished routing the slot for the router plate in another table and have a miter station set up as well.

I was wondering about sanding. I've watched a lot of woodworking programming on youtube and Old Yankee etc. Although I am still a beginner, I've noticed that the oscillating spindle sander gets used alot to refine cuts and "bring them to the line" such as after cuts on the bandsaw etc. The only sanding device I have right now is an orbital sander. I was wondering how critical a spindle sander is to woodworking. It would seem to me having a way to cut "before the line" and then use a sander to "take it down to the line" would help a great deal with exactness. Also noticed that home depot carries an edge sander: http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671#.UhviDBvbPIW

Would that do the job as well? If one did not have such a tool what would one use? Seems pretty critical to me.

Thanks!
 

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For something like you are thinking about, consider the drill press spindle sanding drum selections. I use those for curves and circles. They have different sizes and different grits, and fit in the chuck of the drill press, bench or floor models. If irc I got mine at Harbor Freight.


http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1268&site=ROCKLER
 

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You need to ask yourself how often to you sand curved surfaces. You can get a drum sander and use it an a hand drill or a drill press. Granted the oscillating sander is nice but I've owned my own custom woodworking business for 27 years and I don't have one. Sometimes I will just use the front wheel on my belt sander for that application. The only thing the oscillating sander does is move the drum up and down so if you do a lot of sanding it doesn't wear out the sandpaper as bad.
 

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Successfully using the front drum on a hand held belt sander is a testament to Steve's skill level.

I don't have that skill and dexterity so I use one of these...

http://www.ridgid.com/tools/oscillating-edge-belt--spindle-sander/en/index.htm

... it's nice to be able to index your workpiece to a table to keep your finished cut at 90°.

Same thing goes for using the belt sander function of the Ridged sander for outside curves.

At $200.00 the ridged is a great value.
 

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I can tell you that I've been doing woodworking for nearly 30 years and have a pretty complete shop, but never really considered buying a spindle sander. On the occasions where I needed to bring a curved edge to the line, I found a way to do it pretty simply. For straight edges, a jointer, hand plane, or even a belt sander will work, and are more versatile tools.
 

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Depends on what your building....with the stuff I build, I have no use for one
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yank said:
For something like you are thinking about, consider the drill press spindle sanding drum selections. I use those for curves and circles. They have different sizes and different grits, and fit in the chuck of the drill press, bench or floor models. If irc I got mine at Harbor Freight.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1268&site=ROCKLER
Thanks everyone for the answers. I think I would also have issues being precise with a handheld sander. I also noticed the rigid sander that someone pointed out but the idea of a drill press with the sanding attachments is interesting. I don't have a drill press yet so I could kill two birds with one stone.

Any thoughts on the pros vs cons of the drill press approach vs rigid?
 

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I'm with most... like Yank, I have the drum selections and use them on my drill press and hand drills. And like Ed h, for the straight edge, I use a jointer (hand planes etc also work.)
 

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That is all I use. I don't use one often enough to do that much wear to the sleaves. When you sand for a long time in one spot the paper gets hot and releases the grit so my occasional use works fine. If a person were to sand for hours on end then the oscillating sander would be the best choice. Harbor freight has this set for 25 bucks which has four different sizes. http://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece-quick-change-sanding-drum-set-35455.html

I think if I did get an oscillating sander I would probably get the one Home Depot sells. It doubles as a drum sander and a horizontal belt sander.
 
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