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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought an Ikea Karlby Walnut veneer countertop to use as a workdesk / table for my computer.
I want to apply natural Danish oil onto it. I hope this color will not change the current color or darken it too much, please tell me if this is the right choice. I don't have much knowledge about woodworking or finishing except from a little bit of googling and watching YouTube videos. I want to keep the table pretty matte looking but with some protection and feel Danish oil would do a good job for that. So I want to know - would I have to apply mineral spirits onto the table before applying the Danish oil? I've read, "The countertop is pre-treated with a hard wax oil to create an easy-care surface that does not require oiling before the first use." But I was also told not to put mineral spirits on veneer because of the glue. So I am a little confused as to what to do about this. Should I just sand it without putting mineral spirits and then apply Danish oil? Or should I just not treat my table since its already treated?
Thank you for any advice!
 

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I'd recommend keeping things simple. It's already got finish on it, so I'd use it as is. If you find you don't like that finish, then go ahead and do the work.

The hard wax finish is likely an OSMO brand or similar. That type of wax has relatively good reviews. It does have its limitations, but again, I'd just use it as is and see if it works for you.

From the pictures on their website, it looks to be a thick veneer, around 1/8". If you do end up sanding, there's much less of a concern about burning through the veneer than if the veneer was only 1/32" thick.
 

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The “hard wax oil” is a finish. I wouldn’t mess with it, just use a commercial product like Howard’s FeedNWax or a lemon polish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The “hard wax oil” is a finish. I wouldn’t mess with it, just use a commercial product like Howard’s FeedNWax or a lemon polish.
I'd recommend keeping things simple. It's already got finish on it, so I'd use it as is. If you find you don't like that finish, then go ahead and do the work.

The hard wax finish is likely an OSMO brand or similar. That type of wax has relatively good reviews. It does have its limitations, but again, I'd just use it as is and see if it works for you.

From the pictures on their website, it looks to be a thick veneer, around 1/8". If you do end up sanding, there's much less of a concern about burning through the veneer than if the veneer was only 1/32" thick.
Okay, I will do that! Thank you all so much for the help!
 

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I recently bought an Ikea Karlby Walnut veneer countertop to use as a workdesk / table for my computer.
I want to apply natural Danish oil onto it. I hope this color will not change the current color or darken it too much, please tell me if this is the right choice. I don't have much knowledge about woodworking or finishing except from a little bit of googling and watching YouTube videos. I want to keep the table pretty matte looking but with some protection and feel Danish oil would do a good job for that. So I want to know - would I have to apply mineral spirits onto the table before applying the Danish oil? I've read, "The countertop is pre-treated with a hard wax oil to create an easy-care surface that does not require oiling before the first use." But I was also told not to put mineral spirits on veneer because of the glue. So I am a little confused as to what to do about this. Should I just sand it without putting mineral spirits and then apply Danish oil? Or should I just not treat my table since its already treated?
Thank you for any advice!
If the counter is treated with a hard wax then I would just wax it. The Danish oil wouldn't really work because the wood is already sealed.

It may be a bad idea to put mineral spirits on the veneer. A lot of modern veneer is applied with hot melt glue or there is the peal and press veneer which both would delaminate if soaked with mineral spirits. If it were an antique where a real adhesive was used then mineral spirits wouldn't hurt anything but you have to be careful with the way things are manufactured today.
 
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