Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Joists 12 or 16” OC?

The deck we removed was on 16” and seemed a little “spongy”.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,885 Posts
Joists 12 or 16” OC?

The deck we removed was on 16” and seemed a little “spongy”.
I've seen countless times decking such as Trex bowing down between the framing on 16" centers. Therefore I normally persuade my customers away from it and use treated pine. This week though I have a customer insist on it so I'm doing 12" spacing on the framing. He also wanted the Trex with the dado on the edge to hide the fasteners. I especially hate that. It leaves a 1/4" wide gap between the decking and is particularly hard getting the clips into the groove on 16' long pieces. The clips need a wider foot to hold them up so you can slide the material together.

I think an existing deck with 16" spacing on the framing a person should install some 2x4 blocking between the framing to support the shortcomings of the composite decking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Treated pine decking doesn't do very well in my climate. I've had them deteriorate pretty badly, even in spite of sealing every year. But - I'll give that some thought since its going to be under a roof. If I stained and sealed it, that might work ok.

We just like the look of composite better. I was going to use the clips, but that much gap would be a "no go" for me, I want to keep the spacing at a minimum. The last one I face screwed and it looked pretty awful.

This will be pretty well protected (screened, 2' overhang). What do you think about a waterproof vinyl plank floor over a waterproofed ply subfloor?

Ring shank nails vs. screws?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
Treated pine decking doesn't do very well in my climate. I've had them deteriorate pretty badly, even in spite of sealing every year. But - I'll give that some thought since its going to be under a roof. If I stained and sealed it, that might work ok.

We just like the look of composite better. I was going to use the clips, but that much gap would be a "no go" for me, I want to keep the spacing at a minimum. The last one I face screwed and it looked pretty awful.

This will be pretty well protected (screened, 2' overhang). What do you think about a waterproof vinyl plank floor over a waterproofed ply subfloor?

Ring shank nails vs. screws?
As you may know, there can be a big difference in treated pine. I have used big box treated pine for my exposed deck that did not hold up especially well. However, the name brand pine I got from a local lumber dealer that is treated for ground contact has held up very well. Treatment for ground contact is very important as it has better penetration of the treatment chemicals. Also, any cuts you make exposing the interior of the plank should be brush treated with something like Copper Coat (a Rustoleum product, I think). It stinks like the devil. So, it's got to be good. It also helps to cover the tops of your joists with stick on rubber flashing material. Also, cover any vertical surfaces with the rubber where there will be gaps that can trap dirt, leaves, etc. and hold moisture; like around posts. This is a very good construction guide:
Keeping Water Out of Decks

Given the greater flex in the composites, I would definitely go with a 12" spacing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I went with 12" spacing on a Trex deck in 2000 and have been glad I did. The deck is still perfectly flat and solid. This is a cold climate, and the deck is well shaded. Hot sun would probably affect it more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,885 Posts
Treated pine decking doesn't do very well in my climate. I've had them deteriorate pretty badly, even in spite of sealing every year. But - I'll give that some thought since its going to be under a roof. If I stained and sealed it, that might work ok.

We just like the look of composite better. I was going to use the clips, but that much gap would be a "no go" for me, I want to keep the spacing at a minimum. The last one I face screwed and it looked pretty awful.

This will be pretty well protected (screened, 2' overhang). What do you think about a waterproof vinyl plank floor over a waterproofed ply subfloor?

Ring shank nails vs. screws?
The brand of treated wood makes a big difference. I use LifeWood and don't have any problems. I replaced a deck on a utility trailer with it 13 years ago and have never sealed it with anything and it's still in good condition. On the other hand I built a porch for a customer and the screen door I made I used Yellawood and within 2 years the bottom of the door completely rotted off. The door was primed and painted on all edges including the bottom edge. Some of these companies just put the wood in open tanks of that chemical and call it pressure treated. You can often tell when you cut a board and look at the end grain. The chemical had only soaked in 1/8" and the center of the board is untreated. Of course over time the wood gets a few surface cracks and the cracks allow water to penetrate to the untreated center of the wood. Then the decay starts.

Then you have to pay attention to the labeling on treated wood. There is some that says treated appearance or for above ground contact. I only use wood that is rated for ground contact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Not to be that guy...but the manufacturers typically publish very good recommendations for their specific products. I recommend looking those up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TimPa

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The brand of treated wood makes a big difference. I use LifeWood and don't have any problems. I replaced a deck on a utility trailer with it 13 years ago and have never sealed it with anything and it's still in good condition. On the other hand I built a porch for a customer and the screen door I made I used Yellawood and within 2 years the bottom of the door completely rotted off. The door was primed and painted on all edges including the bottom edge. Some of these companies just put the wood in open tanks of that chemical and call it pressure treated. You can often tell when you cut a board and look at the end grain. The chemical had only soaked in 1/8" and the center of the board is untreated. Of course over time the wood gets a few surface cracks and the cracks allow water to penetrate to the untreated center of the wood. Then the decay starts.

Then you have to pay attention to the labeling on treated wood. There is some that says treated appearance or for above ground contact. I only use wood that is rated for ground contact.
Agree. I have bought lumber from a place that describes lumber as “treated”, but it’s not PT.

Unless I go to a place that makes the stuff for docks, I’m basically stuck with the HD stuff.

Re deck boards, moot point, the boss wants composite. I‘m going to work on her some more. I think if the boards are knot free, relatively dry, stained and sealed they won’t look bad. And since it’s under cover no sun damage.

Re posts, I’ve also learned not to use concrete, but gravel. I do think it makes a difference.

I bought a bunch of 6x6’s which I ended up not using. Stacked and spaced well off the ground, but under some trees. 5 years later they were completely rotted away.

Bittom line - PT lumber is not the same as it used to be.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
16’ composite $28, pine $12 .50

12’ 2x8 $26

The boss and I will be having a meeting😊.

I won’t get my Bronco at this rate. 😜
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
I recommend composite. It will look good for a much longer time than treated lumber. The only maintenance that will be required is a good pressure washing every other year or so. I have had both and speak from experiance, I have also installed a lot of both for customers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
I think you will both be happy in the long run.
And then there is the "Happy wife, happy life" thing.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top