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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm watching videos on YouTube and people say "apply your first coat of finish and wait X hours"... They show the piece sitting on a set of blocks while they wipe on the finish to the one side / edges... None of the videos have addressed what to do about the under side....

Do you apply finish to top and sides and let dry then flip and finish the bottom? So 1 coat takes 2 days?

or

Do you apply finish to all 4 sides and let dry while propping up on those pyramid looking blocks?
 

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I'm watching videos on YouTube and people say "apply your first coat of finish and wait X hours"... They show the piece sitting on a set of blocks while they wipe on the finish to the one side / edges... None of the videos have addressed what to do about the under side....

Do you apply finish to top and sides and let dry then flip and finish the bottom? So 1 coat takes 2 days?

or

Do you apply finish to all 4 sides and let dry while propping up on those pyramid looking blocks?
What kind of "piece"? If it's a cabinet, set face up. Top, bottom, sides, and front edges are accessible.





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I'm watching videos on YouTube and people say "apply your first coat of finish and wait X hours"... They show the piece sitting on a set of blocks while they wipe on the finish to the one side / edges... None of the videos have addressed what to do about the under side....

Do you apply finish to top and sides and let dry then flip and finish the bottom? So 1 coat takes 2 days?

or

Do you apply finish to all 4 sides and let dry while propping up on those pyramid looking blocks?
I nearly always finish the underside of wood even if it doesn't show. If you just finish the top side it allows moisture from the air to get to the underside and make the wood swell making the wood warp. I normally start with anything I finish turned upside down and finish that first. Then turn it over and finish what shows the most. Sometimes when you turn a piece over it will mar the finish and it's better to mark something that doesn't really show. As far as the drying time between coats a lot would depend on which finish you use and the weather at the time. There are some finishes that in warm weather you can turn over and put coat on the other side within a couple of hours or sand and put a second coat on. Some spray on finishes are even faster.
 

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Your salid bowl finish is likely mineral oil. I would just apply a coat a day for a week, then one coat a weak for a month, then one coat a month for a year. Then coat as needed when it looks dry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your salid bowl finish is likely mineral oil. I would just apply a coat a day for a week, then one coat a weak for a month, then one coat a month for a year. Then coat as needed when it looks dry.
Salad Bowl finish is different than Mineral oil. Its more like a varnish.

My problem is that the cutting board was supposed to be usable on both sides so no real top or bottom but I'm getting drip marks on the underside. Even though I wipe the finish on lightly.
 

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Could you tell us what the finish is then. If it's more like a varnish then apply it as thin as possible on one side at a time and let it dry according to the label instructions. Then turn it over and do the other side. When that dries then sand it with 220 grit paper and put another coat on in the same way. For a cutting board I don't think I would apply more than two coats. From time to time it would probably be necessary to nearly sand all the finish off and apply a fresh coat of finish.
 

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+1 here an you do both sides one side at a time once dry flip over an do other side
 

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Your salid bowl finish is likely mineral oil. I would just apply a coat a day for a week, then one coat a weak for a month, then one coat a month for a year. Then coat as needed when it looks dry.
Somebody most likely on a forum started that sequence years ago, and some liked it so much they kept repeating it. Amazing how ditties like that get around. It's sorta catchy, but in reality, re-application of the oil should be on an as needed basis.






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Somebody most likely on a forum started that sequence years ago, and some liked it so much they kept repeating it. Amazing how ditties like that get around. It's sorta catchy, but in reality, re-application of the oil should be on an as needed basis.







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I wouldn't know what someone started on this forum years ago. I was using mineral oil that way before there was a internet.
 

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Not sure what to say other then "Salad bowl finish"

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2000752/9151/general-finishes-salad-bowl-finish-quart.aspx

I put 4 coats on. I guess I screwed it up.
I'm having dificulty finding out what is in it. It seems to be described to be more like a oil based polyurethane however General Finishes recommends letting it dry 72 hours between coats which is odd. They also don't recommend if for cutting boards so you will have to do extra cleaning and maintenance to use it.

I believe you have really only have two options. You could take the finish off and use mineral oil or you can sand the drip marks out of the finish and put another thin coat of the salad finish on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm having dificulty finding out what is in it. It seems to be described to be more like a oil based polyurethane however General Finishes recommends letting it dry 72 hours between coats which is odd. They also don't recommend if for cutting boards so you will have to do extra cleaning and maintenance to use it.

I believe you have really only have two options. You could take the finish off and use mineral oil or you can sand the drip marks out of the finish and put another thin coat of the salad finish on.
It says 72 hours before food contact, 6-12 hours between coats. The can also says "for use on butcher blocks", Woodcrafts website says cutting boards, and several internet sources like The wood whisperer recommend it for cutting boards.
 

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The can also says "for use on butcher blocks", Woodcrafts website says cutting boards, and several internet sources like The wood whisperer recommend it for cutting boards.
SO WHAT!!! I wouldn't eat at their house.:no: Think health issues. With a film finish, and used for cutting, the film gets penetrated with knife cuts. Parts of the finish can end up in the food. Butcher blocks and cutting boards need to be washed. With incisions in the finish, they allow the growth of bacteria. With cuts in the finish, moisture can get to the seal of the film and the wood. Not a finish I would use or recommend.

If the board is decorative and not used for cutting, slicing , or dicing, a film finish could be considered.






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