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Discussion Starter #1
A year or so ago we milled up a good sized water oak log (red oak family) that had a lot of defects (limbs, knots, powderpost beetle holes, etc.) in the log. Most of the resulting boards were #2 common, with a few #1's thrown in.

Because most customers prefer FAS or select boards, when the lumber came out of the kiln I marked it as "shop wood" and set it aside for my own use.

Fast forward to last month when a customer approached me about a trade. If I would supply the lumber, he would make two identical pieces of furniture - one for him to sell and one for me to keep. He suggested a pie safe, and I agreed with the stipulation that we add some additional depth to it and design it so that it could be used to house computer equipment and servers. We incorporated some muffin fans for heat removal into the design, along with fresh-air inlet vents at the bottom on the back.

I told him about my "shop wood" stash, and together we went through the pile and selected boards that had enough usable lumber between defects to be suitable for the project. Being a "wide quartersawn board" type of guy, the only glue-up on the exterior wood is on the top where we joined two wide boards together. The side panels are made from a bookmatched panels that came from a single board.

I took care of all of the surfacing, ripping, resawing, etc, and also mixed up a dye combination that I liked. He did the final dimensioning, finishing, assembly, etc.

This is a surprise gift for my wife for our anniversary. She is going to be out of town for a few days; my plan is to move all of the computer equipment that is currently spread around her office into it and surprise her upon her return.

Here is the finished product. I think that his craftsmanship really turned out well.

Sometimes I am surprised about how quartersawn red oak (as well as boards with defects) get a bad rap. Being fortunate enough to run a sawmill, I have seen a lot of very pretty lumber, and QSRO ranks right up there with QSWO in terms of ray fleck, ect.

Scott
















 

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Those 'defects', at least from the photos, look more like really nice figuring and character. That's a really nice looking piece, well done!

That said, the only safe place for pie is in my belly.
 

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where's my table saw?
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excellent

Nice wood, also my favorite, really good color stain and very good craftsmanship on all the aspects including the metal work.

You did good. :thumbsup: bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Beautiful job. Love the looks of quartersawn oak. Do you mind sharing your dye/stain mixture to get the finish?
I don't mind at all. I really prefer dye's for quartersawn oak - especially red oak, because they don't accumulate in the open pores the way that a stain will.

On this project I mixed up Transtint golden brown and amber (2:1 ratio), approximately 60 drops of golden brown and 30 drops of amber in about 20 oz of distilled water.

My customer applied the dye by pre-wetting the wood to raise the grain, followed by a light sanding, then the dye was applied, and once dry it was lightly sanded with 1200 grit in order to remove some of the dye from the medullary rays.

It was then coated with several layers of Minwax wipe-on poly.
 

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I thought I was the only one to call it water oak. Nice to know that some one else calls it that also.

Beautiful work considering its made from "shop wood". Heck how about dropping some of that stuff off at my shop... :laughing:
 
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