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Should push sticks be used if you have a blade cover on your table saw? It does not seem to me that they would be necessary (but I am new to this).
Thanks
 

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where's my table saw?
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hmmm

Yes. I use a push stick unless I am at least 4 inches from the blade.
Do you mean the fence is 4" from the blade? I use one when the wood is 2" from the blade or less and then I like to use a push shoe rather than a stick. However, I saw through some of my push sticks when the work is very narrow. They are easily repaired on the end when they no longer grab the edge properly. I use a bandsaw to recreate the notch.
 

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woodnthings said:
What key is that hymn in?:laughing: Is it a sing along?:laughing:

However, I saw through some of my push ticks when the work is very arrow.
What are push ticks? And what kind of arrows? Real feathers?

Anyway, for the OP, I use push sticks, push shoes, blocks, whatever is needed if the cut looks like it could be hazardous, or if the aid would benefit the type of cut, even with the guard on. I'm not proud.







.
 

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I've never cared for push sticks but do use a push shoe/block of my own design of varying thicknesses and I use one on nearly every rip cut regardless of width.

The reason I do is because we've all seen the board coming away from the fence that causes kick back but it's never mentioned why it leaves the fence surface at the far end. Oh, once in awhile someone will say they just lost concentration for some reason.

Then one day I set at my desk, and while assuming a few different positions left to right, I pressed my right thumb against the desk edge, arm slightly extended, and my fingers on the desk top as they would be when ripping a board.

As I applied thumb pressure my finger tips moved in a CCW direction. No surprise there but that happens to be in the same CCW rotation that causes the kick backs. The finger tips can be made to move in a CW direction but with the hand pivoting on the thumb it's un-natural. And to top it off we waxed the table top so material would slide easier.:thumbsup:

In the video look at the different locations of the operator's body position in relation to the saw table when he intensionally causes a kick back and when he makes a successful cut. It's difficult to assume correct position for every situation and cut so that's why I enlist the aid of the push shoe/block.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Ok, Ok easy now

What key is that hymn in?:laughing: Is it a sing along?:laughing:



What are push ticks? And what kind of arrows? Real feathers?

Anyway, for the OP, I use push sticks, push shoes, blocks, whatever is needed if the cut looks like it could be hazardous, or if the aid would benefit the type of cut, even with the guard on. I'm not proud.







.
I've worn the paint off the letters on my keyboard and the hunt and peck method requires actually seeing the letters. Sorry for any confusion. My spell check works great, but if the syntax is incorrect it won't show in red. :no:
 

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I use a few different designs depending on clearance and use them for most cuts. Cutting down sheet goods or other large pieces are the exception. What ever you decide, make sure you are comfortable before every cut.
 

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Yes. I use a push stick unless I am at least 4 inches from the blade.
You are braver than I am. I want my hands at least 6 inches away. Of course that will vary with the situation. And if we are talking about between the blade and fence I want even more room.

George
 

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You are braver than I am. I want my hands at least 6 inches away. Of course that will vary with the situation. And if we are talking about between the blade and fence I want even more room.

George
I was guessing LOL.....with the fence I want more than 6"! I use sometype of push stick or other device about 90 percent of the time. I mostly do samll things.
 

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After being up for 20hrs I had a lapse of judgment. While making repetitive cuts in one by pine I actually had my left thumb over the blade. The result is 6 stitches and a tetanus shot. If I hadn't had the blade set up for minimal exposure it would have been much worse. I knew better, I had been using 2 push sticks to guide the material through the saw. Like I tell my grandson "if your gonna be stupid you gotta be tough".
 
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