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Hi All
I found this forum whilst searching for information about finishing off some wood and thought it looked like a good place to ask a few questions...

Fist let me explain my current situation. My girlfriend and I moved to a new house a few months ago and at present we are giving the lounge a makeover, as part of this, we are building some cupboards into alcoves either side of the chimney breast and also putting up some nice wooden shelves.

Whilst we are working away on the building I'm also thinking about how we will finish the wood off to give it some protection and to give it a nice finish.

The wood we are using is pine furniture board (I know it's not the best wood but it's much nicer than chipboard flat pack which is the alternative that we can afford...). It's quite nice wood and looks pretty good but it is very light. we would like to give it a little bit of colour to darken it a little whilst keeping the lovely grain but we're not sure on the best way.

We've tried various wood stains and not found anything we really like so far, an antique pine one was top runner until we saw it in artificial light when we realised it became or sort of sludgy green colour.

We've also tried natural danish oil which does give a nice feel and sheen to the wood but not enough colour

From my research I've come across tinted danish oils but without trying them it's hard to know what colour they will come up on the wood and they are too expensive really to buy loads and find you don't like them...

I am also a little concerned that we should possibly add something like a varnish or lacuer over any oil finish to give it some physical protection as we have a 2 year old boy and at some point would like another child so the cupboards and unit top could probably do with some protection from being bashed with toys etc...but we would like to keep the lovely feel of the wood if possible...

Does anyone have any thoughts or advice on what might be the best route to take?

Any help very much appreciated!!!
 

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The Danish oil is alright if you have an application where it doesn't get wet. Depending on which species of pine you use you might have to re-apply the Danish oil pretty often until you get it fully sealed. Some pine is more porous than others and will need more finish. Just re-apply if and when the wood starts looking dry. If you have an application where someone might set a sweaty glass on the wood from time to time you might consider a polyurethane topcoat. It doesn't necessarily have to be applied thick and plastic looking and if you use a flat or satin sheen should have much the same appearance as the Danish oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for replying.

Would a polyurethane topcoat also help protect the wood from knocks and bumps? (might be useful with my little boy running about!!!

Also, if it does get scratched etc, is it easy repair the finish of a polyurethane topcoat?

Lastly can you recommend any products that are available in the uk?
 

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Old School
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If the product you are using has a label that says...Danish Oil Finish, it's not just an oil, but a mix of boiled linseed oil, varnish resins, and mineral spirits. It can be a stand alone finish with several applications.

Depending on the wood, you may need to condition it first if it's prone to blotching. I would start with a 50/50 wipe with Zinsser Seal Coat. After that you could use an oil base stain, or dyes to get the color you want. When that dries, you can topcoat with an oilbase polyurethane, oilbase interior varnish, or a waterbase polyurethane.









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The product I've been using is Colron Natural Danish Oil.

http://www.colronrefined.co.uk/


I'm contemplating one of their colooured oils but don't want to end up paying out for several different ones to find a colour I like as they are quite expensive!

I'm also still concerned about the durability/protection from knocks and bumps, and wonder if I might be best of just varnishing...though I'd like to be able to maintain some of the nice feel of the wood really which danish oil does.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Can you point me in the direction of any products that can go over the top of the danish oil to give a little more physical protection?
 

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Sorry, I meant an actual product name or similar as there are so many different products out there and I don't really know exactly what to look for...
 

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Old School
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Sorry, I meant an actual product name or similar as there are so many different products out there and I don't really know exactly what to look for...
I'm not in the UK, and I don't know what brands are sold there. As I mentioned...look for...

oil base polyurethane

oil base interior varnish

Waterbased polyurethne






.
 

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A Danish oil finish is enough alone and is less likely to show knicks and bumps than if you put a protective coating over it. The only real benefit of a protective coating is to seal if from water. If the only damage is from knicks or scratches then a fresh coat of oil usually makes the spots almost disappear. I'm not in England either but this company looks pretty good, http://www.wattspolyurethane.co.uk/
 

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Wood Snob
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valve90210 said:
The product I've been using is Colron Natural Danish Oil.

http://www.colronrefined.co.uk/

I'm contemplating one of their colooured oils but don't want to end up paying out for several different ones to find a colour I like as they are quite expensive!

I'm also still concerned about the durability/protection from knocks and bumps, and wonder if I might be best of just varnishing...though I'd like to be able to maintain some of the nice feel of the wood really which danish oil does.
Valve
Here is a link to a finishing method that will work with the Danish oil. Polycrapoline is pretty much the flavor spoken here because it seems many feel a need to make wood look like a shinny piece of plastic.

This finish can be applied and success is easy to achieve. The key to making it hard and durable is in the first coat. Flood it on and let it soak in. Add more to areas that appear to be drying or soaking in. This puts the finish deeper into the wood where the wood becomes harder and gives you the durability without loosing the beauty of the grain.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/how-to-apply-wiping-varnish.aspx

I do a version of this and it's been on my kitchen tables for over 25 years.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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As you already tried out danish oil and not sure about the color yield by tinted danish oils. It would be better to use varnish or lacuer over wood surface.
 
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