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I am working on another blanket chest for a family member and am finally at the finish point. After putting down a coat of oil based stain I noticed a couple boards that did not take the stain well at all. I sanded from 80 - 220.

Did I over do it on the 220? I have heard of over sanding but I always thought that was around 600 grit. I searched the forum but did not find a clear answer.

Should I work it over with some steel wool before my next coat?

What say the experienced? Thanks in Advance!

JJ
 

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I don't think that sanding to 220 grit was sanding too fine, however did you go from 80 to 220 grit or did you sand it with another grit between? It would be too big of a step to go from 80 to 220 grit. The 220 grit paper would wear out before it sanded uniform, and more or less burnish the wood. It also may have been something with the stain or maybe the couple of boards were more dense to begin with. What brand of stain did you use?
 

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Old School
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Thanks for the feedback.

I used Cabot Golden Oak, and after the 80 I hit it with 150.

Perhaps in the future I will stop at 180.
How Red Oak is finished is a personal decision. There's no "proper" sanding routine, other than certain guidelines for what finish will follow. For some, the differential in the grain elevations, and having the "feel" of wood, would require no paste filler, but could just include a sealer and film finish topcoat. If the finished effect desired is a slick smooth finish with no natural wood texture to the grain, then a paste wood filler (AKA grain filler) would be used.






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Rick Mosher
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Proper grit progression in sanding would be 80 to 100 to 120 to 150 it is not a good idea to skip grits. The main bulk of your sanding, flushing joints etc would be done with the 80 grit then the next grits are used to eliminate the sanding scratches from the previous grit. Personally for my own non-commercial projects I prefer the look of a scraper or a hand plane as opposed to sandpaper.
 
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