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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for advice on the proper technique required to joint a board edge. I have done a lot of it but I am pretty much self taught. The boards I am jointing are white cedar, 46 inches long, 8 inch wide.They are rough sawn lumber that has been planed. The edges are slightly bowed as one would expect. I am sure there is plenty I could learn that would help me become more efficient.
Thanks
 

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where's my table saw?
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this is pretty useful



 

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Generally, you want to joint one face first. Then joint an edge with the freshly jointed face against the jointer's fence. Next step is to run the board through the planer to true the other side. Lastly, true the remaining edge by ripping it on a table saw.

With your 8" cedar, you would need an 8" jointer to do this, though. Otherwise you may have to use a planer sled to get the first face true. Or rip the cedar in half, do the milling and glue it back together. This might be advantageous from a warping/cupping standpoint.

I was searching for a picture that would show how to position the grain direction in relationship to the direction of feed (prevents chipping and tear-out). I found a good picture in this article which also has a lot of other tips: http://workshopcompanion.com/KnowHo...ing/2_Jointing_KnowHow/2_Jointing_KnowHow.htm

Bill

PS: woodnthings was faster than me!
PS Again: I just re-read your post and saw that the lumber has already been planed.
 

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Generally, you want to joint one face first. Then joint an edge with the freshly jointed face against the jointer's fence. Next step is to run the board through the planer to true the other side. Lastly, true the remaining edge by ripping it on a table saw.
I will usually take just enough off that last rough edge on the jointer to prevent splinters when ripping to width on the table saw.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Jointer technique

Edge jointing a board, to get it straight and 90 degrees to the face can also be done on the table saw, easier and faster. :yes:
I use a board straighten jig like this: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/board-straightening-jig-table-saw-16999/


However, that was not your question. :no:

First thing I do is sight down the board to determine which way it's curved and put the concave side down.
I run it in part way, from both ends with a fairly deep 1/8" cut, sighting down it after each partial run. This allows me to remove the extra material from the board without making repeated passes and wasting the wood.
Your jointer should have beds longer than 46", the length of your board, for best results. This is why I use the 8 ft long jig on the table saw. It will straight an 8 ft long board in one pass. I have a shorter jig, around 5 ft long that's easier to manage for those length boards.
Eventually after jointing in from each end, it will look straight enough to run a full length pass. Always keep the same face against the fence and flip the board end for end using this procedure. :yes:
 

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+1 to your straightening jig. Liked your you tube videos, but was disappointed they did no show the correct way to apply pressure to the board when edge jointing. My problem is getting the board straight on the jointer because they always seem to come out bowed, I know it has to do with pressure before and after the board enters the knives.
 

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My problem is getting the board straight on the jointer because they always seem to come out bowed, I know it has to do with pressure before and after the board enters the knives.
The way I do it is to feed initially with gentle pressure to keep flat to the infeed table. Once it's past the knives, slowly transfer the pressure to the outfeed, while maintaining some pressure on the infeed. You want to prevent concentrated pressure over the knives, as that will bear into the edge.





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Good tip, C-Man. I tend to push the board down firmly over the cutter-head area. I'll give your method a try as I think I may be over-doing it when face jointing.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have had some dificulty getting longer boards ( 4 foot long ) straight on the edge. It can be tricky. I try to exert more down pressure on the board end that has passed the cutter head and more pressure on pushing the other end. This works best with the bowed side up I have found.
 
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