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I made a small endtable in shop class and i messes up the spray on poly and now im sanding it off. I got almost all of the poly off of the top which is flat. Now i need to get it off of the routed edges. Any ideas as to how to get this poly off without jacking the routing up?
 

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A finish soaks into the wood. It's usually not a good idea to try to sand a finish off but to use a chemical remover. The best retail remover I've used is Kleen Strip. It's available at the box stores and even walmart. You should use chemical gloves and work in a well ventilated place. Just brush the remover on and keep adding remover to the dry spots for about 15 to 20 minutes. On the detail areas you can use a scrub brush or a brass stripping brush but once you start scraping off the old finish you need to move fast. The remover has waxes in it to help prevent evaporation and once you start scraping the old finish starts trying to dry back on. When you get off as much as you can, the residue needs to be thoroughly cleaned off. The methylene chloride and the waxes in it can affect the new finish. You can rince it off using rags and lacquer thinner frequently changing rags. The remover can also be rinces off with water. I use a 1500 psi power washer to clean the residue. It's what professional refinishers use to strip furniture. It will clean the furniture cleaner than anything else you could use and does no damage to the furniture. After running an assembly line type operation for many years stripping hundreds of pieces of furniture nobody at my company ever damaged a piece of furniture with a power washer. Most all of the workers I had were completely inexperienced and many I couldn't speak their language to teach them so the process is completely safe. It does raise the grain but at that stage it's a very good thing to do. It's makes the sanding process more effective.
 

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I would use an MC (methylene chloride) based stripper. The best one I've used is available over the counter (box stores), is "Aircraft Stripper" in the blue can. Follow the directions on the can to a "T". It's gel like and stays in place.

I wouldn't use a pressure washer. It can tear out grain, loosen or remove prior fixes, cause joints to fail, interfere with the adhesion of glued areas, and lift veneer. It will unnecessarily raise the grain, which calls for more sanding than normal. If the piece is a veneer, that sanding may go through the veneer.






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