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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Project liability should be an initial issue when considering taking on a project. Some projects, while seemingly simple, may well be left for those with direct experience. Likewise in doing repairs, competent craftsmanship can make the difference between a good repair and a questionable one.

A deck over water collapsed last night at a local restaurant. The story here. Questions will no doubt come up about the reasons for the collapse. Was the original construction faulty? Was the deck at risk due to lack of maintenance or age? Should the deck have been replaced at some time in the past? Was the establishment at fault for allowing too many people to use it? Was the establishment ever informed what would be a safe capacity?

There are questions that you could ask yourself when considering a project. It's great to get paid for the work, but being qualified matters. There is liability involved even if the work was done as a favor. From simple ones, like hanging a fan, fixing a chair, or swapping out a wall switch/outlet, to building kitchens or entertainment centers. Providing the user with a safe and functional project is paramount.






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Project liability should be an initial issue when considering taking on a project. Some projects, while seemingly simple, may well be left for those with direct experience. Likewise in doing repairs, competent craftsmanship can make the difference between a good repair and a questionable one.

A deck over water collapsed last night at a local restaurant. The story here. Questions will no doubt come up about the reasons for the collapse. Was the original construction faulty? Was the deck at risk due to lack of maintenance or age? Should the deck have been replaced at some time in the past? Was the establishment at fault for allowing too many people to use it? Was the establishment ever informed what would be a safe capacity?

There are questions that you could ask yourself when considering a project. It's great to get paid for the work, but being qualified matters. There is liability involved even if the work was done as a favor. From simple ones, like hanging a fan, fixing a chair, or swapping out a wall switch/outlet, to building kitchens or entertainment centers. Providing the user with a safe and functional project is paramount.








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+1, this is why nearly every state has a system/process for evaluating and licensing all kinds of folks who are involved in construction. I know in VA there is even a licensure process for landscape architects and interior designers (blew my mind since those two professions I tend to regard more as aesthetic versus structural). I am sure there will be all kinds of investigations into this and all sorts of checking of licenses, inspections records, etc. Issues like this occur when folks who aren't educated and experienced in a profession decide to practice that profession. The old "I can figure it out on my own" works just fine for your own home projects, and its even debatable there depending on what the project is, but once you get into accepting money from folks and thus presenting yourself as a professional, you best have all you ducks in a row. I am sure this incident here will be part of Engineering Ethics classes for quite some time.
 

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Liability is one of the (many) reasons I don't make things for anyone outside the immediate family. One only has to watch all the ads on TV by ambulance chasers to see that almost anything can be turned into a basis for a lawsuit.
 

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Does the state of VA actualy test skills for these licenses? My guess is not.

The biggest issue with the "being licensed" statements is that it impresses a false sense of security on the consumer. When in reality those in the trade use it as "marketing" anf the city/state uses it as a form of tax.
 

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From best as I can tell, yes, VA does administer some form of testing for interior decorators and landscape architects. I encountered the whole thing when I was applying for the professional engineer exam, the same board that handles engineer licensure handles the IDs and LAs. On the rules & regs test we had to take for the PE there was stuff about the rules for licensure for ID and LA. I don't know exactly what is on the test, but they do evidently have to prove some level of competency in order to be licensed in those fields.
 

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Old School
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does the state of VA actualy test skills for these licenses? My guess is not.

The biggest issue with the "being licensed" statements is that it impresses a false sense of security on the consumer. When in reality those in the trade use it as "marketing" anf the city/state uses it as a form of tax.
You're entitled to your opinion, but in Florida, that's not the way it is. In order to do on site work, a tradesman needs a CC (Certificate of Competency). To get that you have to have the experience and take tests.

Just licensing for retail or manufacturing is a different story. A manufacturer can sell what they make, but cannot install it. Under the license laws the licensee is liable for the product. At least if dealing with a "licensed" individual there is recourse. It's the unlicensed that should be avoided.






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