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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I built a file cabinet using red oak. On the cabinet top and legs, I rounded the edges with a 1/8" round over bit. I sanded all parts with 150 grit sandpaper.
When I stained the wood (minwax oil), sections of the round over would not hold the stain. All the flat wood stained well. When I saw that the stain was not absorbing I re-stained the round over sections. I left the stain on for about 15 min, but when I wiped off the excess the stain still did not absorb.
I thought perhaps the round over bit was closing the wood grain. So on one of the boards I re-sanded the area with #150, but no luck. Any ideas on what is going on?
I should note there were no problems with the square or chamfered edges.
 

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Try sanding the radius with a little coarser sandpaper, maybe 80x. I think you are right that the router bit closed the grain of the wood.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wanted to give you guys an update on how things went. Here is what I did. I sanded all the round over edges that didn't take the stain with 100 grit sandpaper. Then I reapplied the stain to those areas.. However, once again the stain took in most areas but in other areas the wood appeared to repel the stain i.e. the stain literally moved away from some spots. To be clear, the 'repelled spots' are actually streaks about 1/32" wide that extend anywhere from 3-4 inches to the entire length of the board.
What I wound up doing was dabbing the affected areas with more stain while the first stain was still tacky. This helped a bit but not entirely. After the stain dried I used a touch-up marker which helped a little more (even then the wood repelled).
The file cabinet turned out acceptable but what a pain! This is the second time this has happened. The first was on a kitchen table. In both cases I used red oak, 1/8" round over bit, and dark stain. I still don't have any idea on what is going on and how to prevent for the future. Thanks for all your replies.
 

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Wanted to give you guys an update on how things went. Here is what I did. I sanded all the round over edges that didn't take the stain with 100 grit sandpaper. Then I reapplied the stain to those areas.. However, once again the stain took in most areas but in other areas the wood appeared to repel the stain i.e. the stain literally moved away from some spots. To be clear, the 'repelled spots' are actually streaks about 1/32" wide that extend anywhere from 3-4 inches to the entire length of the board.
What I wound up doing was dabbing the affected areas with more stain while the first stain was still tacky. This helped a bit but not entirely. After the stain dried I used a touch-up marker which helped a little more (even then the wood repelled).
The file cabinet turned out acceptable but what a pain! This is the second time this has happened. The first was on a kitchen table. In both cases I used red oak, 1/8" round over bit, and dark stain. I still don't have any idea on what is going on and how to prevent for the future. Thanks for all your replies.
It generally isn't a good idea to apply stain and let it dry to supplement the color. What happens is the stain dries on the surface and the stain itself doesn't have a good enough bonding agent to stay permanently. The finish will adhere to the stain instead of the wood and when the stain peals off will take the finish with it. The touch up markers are a good idea. They won't interfere with the adhesion of the finish. You can also mask off an area like that and use spray toners or dyes to color in a spot. Another alternative is to mix tinting color with the finish you are going to use to add color. If you are using an oil based enamel you can also use artist oil colors for touch up. If you are using a water based finish you can use artist acrylic paints to mix some touch up color.
 

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Wanted to give you guys an update on how things went. Here is what I did. I sanded all the round over edges that didn't take the stain with 100 grit sandpaper. Then I reapplied the stain to those areas.. However, once again the stain took in most areas but in other areas the wood appeared to repel the stain i.e. the stain literally moved away from some spots. To be clear, the 'repelled spots' are actually streaks about 1/32" wide that extend anywhere from 3-4 inches to the entire length of the board.
What I wound up doing was dabbing the affected areas with more stain while the first stain was still tacky. This helped a bit but not entirely. After the stain dried I used a touch-up marker which helped a little more (even then the wood repelled).
The file cabinet turned out acceptable but what a pain! This is the second time this has happened. The first was on a kitchen table. In both cases I used red oak, 1/8" round over bit, and dark stain. I still don't have any idea on what is going on and how to prevent for the future. Thanks for all your replies.
After re-reading your post a couple times I think you're experiencing "medullary rays". I think all wood has these but, in my opinion, they are much more prominent in red oak. Especially quarter sawn red oak. If your lumber was plain sawn it is quite possible that some of it would actually be rift sawn. As such, when rounding the edges, you would be opening the edge to actual quarter sawn wood, and, with luck :eek:, the medullary rays would appear.
From my own experience with these rays, I haven't found a way to hide them. Many people look at them as beauty marks in the grain.
Maybe someone else knows ways of handling these. If, in fact, these are your problem.:brows:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The wood I used was plain sawn. The 'repelling spots' have occurred on both the long and short grain, although more so the long grain. The spots occurred predominantly at the edge of the curve I.e. just as the bit was turning vertical/horizontal. Edges that were chamfered took the stain well.
I have a suspicion that the round over bit I used is causing the problem. I don't know why though.....it is clean and sharp and didn't burn the wood. I'm going to perform a test on some left over wood using the same project bit (1/8") and a 1/4" round over bit. I'll get back as to the results.
 

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The wood I used was plain sawn. The 'repelling spots' have occurred on both the long and short grain, although more so the long grain. The spots occurred predominantly at the edge of the curve I.e. just as the bit was turning vertical/horizontal. Edges that were chamfered took the stain well.
I have a suspicion that the round over bit I used is causing the problem. I don't know why though.....it is clean and sharp and didn't burn the wood. I'm going to perform a test on some left over wood using the same project bit (1/8") and a 1/4" round over bit. I'll get back as to the results.
You might check your router bit and see if it is healing. That is when the back corner of the cutting edge hits the wood after being cut. You don't see that very often with router bits but it happens. If the back side of the cutting edge is hitting the wood it burnishes the wood.
 
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