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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I understand that the general wisdom is to not use leather gloves when using any power tool, but I am not sure why. One thing I heard was that perhaps the glove can get entangled in the power tool (and thus get the hand entangled too), but that would imply that your hand is close enough to a blade for this to occur. When I use the TS for instance, if I can't keep my hand/fingers at least 2-3 inches away from the blade, I won't use it. I am a beginner and I suppose there are types of cuts where close proximity is unavoidable, but I happily have not found any.


Another related question: The table saw came with two push sticks so I have endevoured to use them, one in each hand, in hopefully appropriate situations: one to push the wood forward and the other to simultaneously hold the wood tight against the fence and pressed down against the top. I do this only when not using it would mean I would need to have a hand too close to the blade.

Is this a proper procedure?

Thanks,
Duncan
 

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I second the featherboard bit... This is NOT a good area to skimp and save your pennies. Get good boards with LOTS of area and flexibility... I have some HF featherboards that are junk. My favorite so far is the Milescraft stacked dual featherboard for my router table... Second to that is the Rockler one... (The Rockler isn't set up to stack...)
 

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Feather bds work on so many levels.........

>they don't get tired or lose holding pwr.

>they don't get splinters

>they do,in most cases,smooth out the feed rate...which in turn smooths out the cut

>they keep fingers out of cutting tool

And can keep going..........


But reason for response is to present an idea,which has to do with work holding/feather bds,ect.

Look at your TS in a sq ftg sort of way.Start paying attention to exactly how much of the table surface you use.Is most of your work 6" or less wide?If so then how much of the table can be cvrd up?The idea is to have a sub-plate that cvrs most of the table that isn't being utilised.Typically this would be the left side of table.Creating this cvr plate then allows you to affix pretty much any feathering device....gaurds....rollers...dust pickups,ect. right to it,instead of trying to figure out ways to attach to CI top.

You can then use DW screws,staples,ect to attach items to the plywd plate.Its pretty simple really,you're benifiting un-used sq ftg to your advantage....instead of wasting it.Drill a hole in it and hang it on the wall.BW
 
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where's my table saw?
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Not For Me..

You said:
Another related question: The table saw came with two push sticks so I have endevoured to use them, one in each hand, in hopefully appropriate situations: one to push the wood forward and the other to simultaneously hold the wood tight against the fence and pressed down against the top. I do this only when not using it would mean I would need to have a hand too close to the blade. Is this a proper procedure? ....

There are some who use 2 push sticks, but not me.
My right hand is pushing the workpiece down, forward and in towards the fence right up until it get's within 4" -6" in front of the blade...we are talkin' rip cuts here. On a wide rip, more than 6", I will push the workpiece all the way through using my right hand, between the blade and the fence and using the splitter. A narrow rip, under 2", I'll switch to the push stick when it reaches 4" - 6" or flip it over and start from the opposite end.
I just don't have the control, down, forward and in towards the fence that I need at the end of a 6" long stick.

My left hand is never in direct line with the blade if I'm using it at all.

Featherboards, if I use them, mostly on narrow stock, are always located in front of the first teeth of the blade, and never behind the blade. A quick set featherboard, like the Rigid magnetic ones will get used more than more than one you have to tighten or loosen.
I just picked up 2 at Home Depot for $30.00 each. Money very well spent in the big picture of shop equipment and safety!
The one on the left:
You need two of these for a router table.
You may want to use 2 on the TS also, but the fences are not magnetic, so you need another type to hold the work down.
:thumbsup: bill
safety first, not last...it's too late then :thumbdown:
 
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This may be a bit off topic but if you plan on using the magswitch magnets or some other brand, be aware that if you are attempting to use them as clamps while welding it greatly interferes with your wire and you won't be able to run a consistent bead. Just thought I would share.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the great advice!

I will get featherboards on my next trip to the store.

I very much like your idea of a subplate especially since the magnetic featherboards don't work on my aluminum topped portable TS.

I also had not considered the idea minimising the use of my left hand. I can see how it would be safer: occationally I get a cold shudder after I do some movement with my hand and I realize that I did not perform that movement will a full consideration of the spinning blade. I have never been close to hurting myself, it is more a realization that you need to always perform precise, considered, practiced movements around the TS. I forget this sometimes and one day it could bite me.


Thanks again for your help.

Duncan
 

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Two Push sticks

One of our accounts just had an accident using a push stick with his left hand. "he will recover use of hand". As he neared he end of his cut, he ajusted the angle of the push stick to add more leverage. the push stick slipped and slid along the surface of the wood along with his hand toward the blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Stephen. The plastic push sticks that came with my saw are smooth at the business end and slide very easily over the wood so I could easily see that happening (though I had not considered it a worry until reading about your client)
 

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In response to your first post, It is never a good idea to wear gloves, long sleeved shirts or jewelry around the majority of your shop equipment most definitely your table saw.

Yes, gloves and loose clothing can get caught in the blade and bring your hand into it. Remember, NO ONE intends to get their hand close to the blade, and that is good practice, but accidents happen and there is no reason to wear items that could make a bad thing worse.

I recently heard a story about a guy at the military base wood shop I have privilege to. His ring got caught in the table saw. Granted it shouldn't have been there in the first place but now he is missing 3 fingers instead of the possible 1 had he not been wearing the ring.

Debatable, I know, But still safe is better than sorry.

As for the feather boards and push sticks. Use them, read up on them and acquire as much info as you can on them. They will help to keep you safe if used properly.

And, I feel it is important to reiterate what someone had mentioned before. NEVER EVER apply pressure to a piece of stock in the direction of the fence at a point behind the saw blade. This can cause the blade to bind which can shoot a piece of lumber at you very quickly. Even if safety isn't an issue, I'm pretty sure it would give you a a fairly uneven cut in the stock anyway. Just don't do it.

Hope this helps,

Wayne
 

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Featherboard.
Also, custom make some wood push sticks... Easy. Just use scraps. I actually put a double angle in mine, in other words... I only notch out half of the tip, so there's an inner "corner" to push with. It helps in applying pressure both towards the fence and through the cut. And if there small pieces, either make a 1/4 plywood pushstick, or just run your other push sticks you've made, right over the blade (but use a zero clearance insert).

Good luck!
 

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Hi,

I understand that the general wisdom is to not use leather gloves when using any power tool, but I am not sure why. One thing I heard was that perhaps the glove can get entangled in the power tool (and thus get the hand entangled too), but that would imply that your hand is close enough to a blade for this to occur. When I use the TS for instance, if I can't keep my hand/fingers at least 2-3 inches away from the blade, I won't use it. I am a beginner and I suppose there are types of cuts where close proximity is unavoidable, but I happily have not found any.


Another related question: The table saw came with two push sticks so I have endevoured to use them, one in each hand, in hopefully appropriate situations: one to push the wood forward and the other to simultaneously hold the wood tight against the fence and pressed down against the top. I do this only when not using it would mean I would need to have a hand too close to the blade.

Is this a proper procedure?

Thanks,
Duncan
Duncan I like many others think 2 push sticks is a bad idea and using a feather board is a good idea. Now as for being a beginner and keeping you fingers 2-3 inches from the blade is another big no in my opinion. My hand was 4-6 inches from the blade a split second before it slipped and took off an index finger and cut my thumb half way threw. Pictures are available in my albums (warning graphic images). I was using a push stick but was in the process of switching to it because the board just got to where I could use it. Ironically I also had a magnetic feather board, 25 years of experience and yet I still had the accident. Things happen and 2-3 inches from blade is really close.
 

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Very deep subject........

There is a Grand Canyon sized gap between wht one does for themselves and what you would have others do.IOWs designing fixtures and safe practices for employees has sorta made me think about safety differently.This "ain't" a condemnation of anyones ideas or in the case of newby employees I may have under me.....its about seeing things differently.

One thing's for sure,most folks using a TS are watching the cut?Yes/No?.........I say yes,and this IS the problem.Any distraction and you're no longer watching the cut.The distractions are many;splinter,slight wave in bd,sawdust,yadayada.So what happens if you're basing your safety on the visual and somthing goes awry?

Lets say I put a hinged cvr on the subplate......its mooring happens to be the same heigth as rip fence......once the whole sublpate/featherbd(which can and should be based on TS's rail) is snugged to bds width....I flip the lid cvr over.Now you can hopefully push the stock through with you eyes closed.Basically you've made it impossible for fingers to get close enough to get cut,EVEN if you TRY.

There will be so many negative reponses to this idea;it takes too long,I'm only making one cut,don't use enough to justify.Now we know how the co. Sawstop is gonna make $$.They're basing their technology on the human condition.Think I'll work on the above premise....make it impossible to touch blade in the first place.BW
 

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about 3:40 minutes into this

Charles Neil brings out a wooden blade cover with quick release magnets. It's easy to make and you can put it anywhere on the table that works.
BW I don't quite follow your idea ...something like this cover mounted to the fence? Got any pictures? :blink: bill

 

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Thanks Stephen. The plastic push sticks that came with my saw are smooth at the business end and slide very easily over the wood so I could easily see that happening (though I had not considered it a worry until reading about your client)
I use a bit of adhesive-backed sandpaper on the holding end of my push sticks. It helps.
 

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Charles Neil brings out a wooden blade cover with quick release magnets. It's easy to make and you can put it anywhere on the table that works.
BW I don't quite follow your idea ...something like this cover mounted to the fence? Got any pictures? :blink: bill

YouTube - WOODWORKING - Cutting Thin Strips on the Table Saw

That blade guard jig is a great idea. I would probably change the top from wood to a lexan for safety yet still have the cut visible. Man I could have used that 8 months ago. :laughing:
 

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One thing's for sure,most folks using a TS are watching the cut?Yes/No?.........I say yes,and this IS the problem.Any distraction and you're no longer watching the cut.BW

I don't agree with that statement. IMO, the operator should not be watching the cut, but rather, watching the stock as it rides on the fence. The stock to fence contact is what's important. Watching the cut does nothing. While you're doing that, the stock can drift off the fence, and then you have a real problem.

I don't use plastic push sticks or featherboards. If you ever saw what plastic can do when impacted, you wouldn't use it. Either by the blade or stock contact, it will literally explode, and send shards of pointy daggers all over the place. I make wood push shoes, sticks and featherboards. Actually, making your own featherboards with longer fingers provides a more graduated contact than plastic ones.

I don't use a push shoe or stick with my left hand. On large sheet stock, the right hand pushes the stock through, and the left hand guides the left edge of the stock against the fence. Smaller (narrower stock) can be both pushed to the fence and through the cut if necessary. Push apparatus is recommended.










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Guess it depends on the plastic(to shard or not).I'd use wood simply because of its availibility in a woodshop.

As I said,deep subject........your point about what opperator "should" be watching vs what a new guy IS watching may very well be at issue here.It comes with experience......but then,so do bad habits.The human eye tends to watch things that are "busy".

I just want the guy's feeding stock,realizing different levels of experience.The more brainless'ly SAFE the opperation,in my pea brain the better.Just sayin.....good discussion,BW
 
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