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If the grain is all running in the same direction, and you have a method to hold the board, like WoodNThings planer sled, it should work.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/planer-sled-rails-14940/

I have done this before with some boards. I used very light passes to minimize the downward force of the rollers/head with each pass.

Has the slab been given enough time to reach moisture equilibrium with your shop? If not, I would wait since you cannot tell if the cupping will change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I picked the slab up from a place about 1/2 hour away so moisture shouldnt be too much of an issue - but, I want to flatten it and get it secured to check any additional movement.

Right now, I am flattening it with a belt sander and its taking forever.

A guy at the mill recommended using a hand held power planer but somehow I think that'll do a bunch of damage to the figure sections.

The slab is 31" max width x 54" long x 1 1/2" +/- thick.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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You need a router sled....there's a thread on here somewhere about building one.
 

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I go at an angle with a hand plane or scrub plane to flatten out a piece that is too wide for my jointer. Works pretty good and is faster then belt sander. -Nice slab... :thumbsup:
 

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depends on dead flat you want it. i would switch to 60 grit on belt than work up through. a router sled will make it flatter than hand sanding.
 

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I'm working in small sections, creating a ledge and I'll be moving on beyond the ledge when that portion is flat.

I'm using 120 grit on my belt sander and I think I'm going to switch to 80.
Nice looking slab. If you get tired and want to drive up to the Lehigh Valley, I can run it through my drum sander for you.
 

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Log dog
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Router sled is the way to go.
It's easy to do and you can use it for them big slabs. I'd do it in my driveway if I didn't have space in garage.
Go for it.
 

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I used a hand held power planer on the figured walnut slab I did recently and it didn't adversely affect the figured portions. Take light cuts. I finished it with a card scraper and that really brought the figure back.

Sweet slab man
 

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I used a trusted straight edge to check the surface as I went.
I hadn't yet begun my foray into hand planes at that point. If I had, I'd probably have planed close to finished with the power planer (with a bit of a skew to keep from tearing out the grain), then jointed flat with a No 7.
 
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