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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all
I've been working on a table for the last few days, and initially, the plan involved pour-over epoxy. The table is made from cast-offs and salvage, so I figured it was a good opportunity to try something different. If it works, I have a nice table. If it doesn't, I'm out the cost of the epoxy and my time.
The top is made from various 2 ft. Pieces of oak, arranged so the grain runs the width of the table. They are braced underneath with 1x3 pine planks, with slotted screws to allow cross grain movement. There is going to be a frame of 3x3 Douglas fir around the table, giving it a small lip. I was intending to pour the epoxy onto the table inside of the frame, and finishing the frame with a couple coats of poly for contrast.
Here's my question(s): I know nothing about using epoxy aside from what I've read here and there. I know that I need to prep the surface with something to prevent the epoxy from bubbling, and have something like a torch or heat gun ready to eliminate any bubbles that come up. I know that I need to be ready to work quickly, a the stuff sets fairly quickly. I know I need to be working on a dead-flat surface, as I'm planning on using self-leveling. I know that the stuff is sandable, but can fog or blush easily. So, what am I missing? It seems like a simple, but not easy process. Any advice from veteran epoxy users? Also, I wouldn't mind some brand recommendations. Having no point of reference, any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Cam
 

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Hey all
I've been working on a table for the last few days, and initially, the plan involved pour-over epoxy. The table is made from cast-offs and salvage, so I figured it was a good opportunity to try something different. If it works, I have a nice table. If it doesn't, I'm out the cost of the epoxy and my time.
The top is made from various 2 ft. Pieces of oak, arranged so the grain runs the width of the table. They are braced underneath with 1x3 pine planks, with slotted screws to allow cross grain movement. There is going to be a frame of 3x3 Douglas fir around the table, giving it a small lip. I was intending to pour the epoxy onto the table inside of the frame, and finishing the frame with a couple coats of poly for contrast.
Here's my question(s): I know nothing about using epoxy aside from what I've read here and there. I know that I need to prep the surface with something to prevent the epoxy from bubbling, and have something like a torch or heat gun ready to eliminate any bubbles that come up. I know that I need to be ready to work quickly, a the stuff sets fairly quickly. I know I need to be working on a dead-flat surface, as I'm planning on using self-leveling. I know that the stuff is sandable, but can fog or blush easily. So, what am I missing? It seems like a simple, but not easy process. Any advice from veteran epoxy users? Also, I wouldn't mind some brand recommendations. Having no point of reference, any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Cam
i have poured 100's of cypress clocks and tables, with expoxy, most all expoxy works the same mabye bar top stuff may be a little different, but not that much, you have time to work with it, make more than you thing you need, don't use a plastic mixing cup, the heat will melt it, i just poured the sturr out and use anything to level it out , it will seak the lever spot any way, now after 1/2 hr or so use the flame from the tortch above the pour tell you see bubbles start to break now that is the height you need to stay, do this a couple times about 1/2 hr apart you could try a 3rd time and see if any remain if not that you are good to go, some other things if a spot of dust of fly or bug get in over the nite all you do is sand it out and do another pour, i use 50 grit , don't worry the sanding marks will not show, also if you havven to get to close and boil the expoxy let it set and than sand it out and do a pour, so nothing is lost but expoxy and time, what i did was make a card board that hung over the item's so that that took care of stuff from floating down on the pour, nothing to loose, do a test on a junk board and see how the bubbles break and let it set us and you will see how it work's, good luck
 

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I use E-Bond Epoxies, which is a local manufacturer in my area. As for a general overview of doing the work, here is a brief explanation. It's really pretty easy.

I can give you a short course. The work area should be absolutely clean, with no moving air. Don't clean, brush off, blow off, or sneeze in or near the work area. If the top has any cracks, knots or holes, they should be plugged/filled with epoxy prior to the pour. The top should be sitting level.

Have the top in an easy to work and move around area. Cover the floor with drop cloths. Visqueen (brand or other brands of clear plastic sheeting) the area completely.

Mixing:
When ready, do not stir either container per se, but rather use a stir stick and slowly pass the bottom of the can for any settling that may have occurred. Slowly mix equal parts so as not to create any bubbles.

For tops that will have an edge with overflow from the top pour:
Use a brush and coat the edges with the mix so when the top is poured it will have a clear run on the edges. Pour from the center of the top near the end and slowly work your way to the other end. For long tops, pour from the center to the outer ends. Allow the mix to run off the edges until you get coverage all the way around.

When the consistency gets to a gelled state, take a knife and cut off the excess from under the top.

For tops with a captive edge:
Depending on the height of the pour desired, you may want to do two pours. If you get ¼" to ⅜" minimum per pour that is fine.

Right after the pour:
Use a propane torch passed over the top, keeping the flame off the epoxy. This will heat up the material so any bubbles will rise and dissipate. Using a heat gun or a hair dryer may cause a gelling or areas that kick too soon, due to the hot forced air. Block or belt sand the cured epoxy off the bottom and ease the sharp edge where it ran off, and it was cut off.

Here is a good site that covers most questions you may have.





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Discussion Starter #5
Guys, as always, I am astounded by the amount of great knowledge here. I try not to abuse the forum by asking questions that a quick search will answer, and this may well have been one of those questions, but you all came through and helped me out. I hope to finish the table(more like a desk) this week, and post pictures. Thanks again for all the help!

WCT
 
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