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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Would it be possible to make a door like this without a router?

I have a table saw, circular saw, drill, I can always get chisels for the holes I wood need to make for the pieces of wood that stick out where the perpendicular pieces join for wood gluing and the clamps, of course. I have no idea what the technical term are for those pieces. :)

I have an oddly shaped opening between my dining room and family room/hall way area. A regular door wouldn't fit for me, and I'm sure something custom would be pretty high up in price.

I've searched and seen tutorials on how to make a french door online, but I can't seem to find something on a door like this.

 

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if the door was going to be hung by an overhead track system, then mortise and tenons wound not be necessary in my opinion, although it would make the door stronger. otherwise, you can groove the edge of the vertical pieces (stiles) and the edges of the horizontal pieces (rails) to accept the panels. the ends of the rails will have tenons that will glue into the stile grooves. decorative quarter round trim can be prucahsed to add the profile around the inside edges of the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep, it will be hanging just as in the pic. So pefect, I wouldn't need the mortise and tenons. Yeah just looked them up, and that is exactly the pieces I was thinking that would be hard for me to make.

So does it make sense with me thinking about it this way: I get thick wood for the border of the door. the inner rails I get them half the thickness so then I can sandwhich plexiglass in between? Once all together then the entire door looks the same thickness on both sides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You could get real close to that door with a table saw only. If you want the profiled edges, I would suggest a router also. :smile:
Yeah, we can do without the fancy edges. We were thinking of a semi rustic look, so any fancy edges would be just fine for us. :)
 

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Are you planning to use that style hardware to hang the door? I would look other hardware or perhaps cover it with a trough with a guide on the bottom.

George
 

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then the house is a barn?

It's hung like a barn door, if you know what I mean. :eek: :yes:

BTW the hardware is perfect for a loft type apartment or condo, old brick and industrial look .... Cool!

The answers is Yes.
You can make the rails (horizontals) and stiles (verticals) with only a table saw. The panels in that door are held in place by small moldings unless I'm mistaken, but the joinery is difficult to establish.

You can make grooves and tenons in all the pieces where they face each other and have the panels contained in the grooves as well as the rails with short tenons. The long pieces in this photo were stiles, the shorter ones, rails for cabinet doors. The grooves were made on a router table, with a slot cutter, BUT you can do the same thing on a table saw with a dado stack or wobble type. See what you think:
 

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Don't give up the mortice and tenon joints for lack of fancy tools. Tenons can be easily done on a table saw, mortices with a drill and chisels. Even the drill is optional.

I speak from experience--I made all of the doors in our house with M/T joints with a small table saw, drill press, router, and chisels.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
The door opening is 46.5" wide so figure the door will need to be about 47.5" inches wide. Because it will be a rather large door, I think it will be best then to do it with mortise and tenons.

Yep, we are planning to hang the door using hardware like this:



Going to pick up some wood chisels and start experimenting soon. Thanks all! I'll start experimenting with a small 1'x1' frame.
 

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Have at it!

Just some more advice however. If you use a groove system with short tongues and glue the panels in it will be very strong. The several of the panels should be plywood, which won't change dimensionally with humidty.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/hollow-chisel-mortiser-worth-42049/
The best method I have used to make mortises is a router with an 1/2"upspiral bit and a self centering base. It leaves a rounded corner in the ends but a 1/2" mortising chisel squares them up easily.

I make my tenons on the bandsaw lately even though I have a nice tenon jig for my table saw. http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/tenoning-jig-modified-15905/
 

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I had to make two doors for my camp that used a roller system. I put my doors together with biscuits. Its been over 20 years now and they are holding up fine.
 

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The best method I have used to make mortises is a router with an 1/2"upspiral bit and a self centering base. It leaves a rounded corner in the ends but a 1/2" mortising chisel squares them up easily.
The OP stated: "Would it be possible to make a door like this without a router?"






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Rails and stiles made with a table saw...You tube videos...lots to see and learn. Check them out and pic what works for you. Test cuts/pieces are a priority.
 

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I didn't say he HAD to use a router

The OP stated: "Would it be possible to make a door like this without a router?".

I just said what I found to be the best method. What's your issue with that? We already covered the use of the table saw. Sheeessch :thumbdown:

Maybe someone else has the same question who does have a router and will find the suggestion "helpful"? You gotta an issue with that also?

Maybe after doin' the mortises by hand he will want to get a router?
 
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The door will just basically hang there on the hardware. It's not a hinged door that needs a strong axial joint. If the suggestion to make grooves and tenons, which seems to qualify for a T&G joint, that's quite a bit of saw work to get good alignment.

However deep the groove should be, and how wide the tongue should be may be moot, as the process is somewhat similar to a true M&T, where you have a true tenon at the ends of the rails, and a mortise that's is sized in length to the tenon.

FWIW, the door could be just assembled with the rails butt joined to the stiles with glue and clamps. When the joints have cured, drill out the outer edges of the stiles with long ½" dowels into the rails. A simple yet effective way of joining. Still not as good as half laps IMO, which offer the most strength due to all the gluing surface. But, as I said...the door just hangs there.






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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
...But, as I said...the door just hangs there.
Yep for sure. With the half laps I'd be worried the thing would fall apart. I'm still not sure if I am going to use plexiglass in the middle or real glass, and I'd be super paranoid about the bottom just falling out. Although this probably sounds stupid since glue or epoxy will do a damn fine job holding the two sides together.

But if you feel that it will be enough to hold the door together with enough glue and drying time, then I will certainly give it a go that way.
 

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Yep for sure. With the half laps I'd be worried the thing would fall apart. I'm still not sure if I am going to use plexiglass in the middle or real glass, and I'd be super paranoid about the bottom just falling out. Although this probably sounds stupid since glue or epoxy will do a damn fine job holding the two sides together.

But if you feel that it will be enough to hold the door together with enough glue and drying time, then I will certainly give it a go that way.
Half laps with a good fit would be a very substantial joint. I would use TB II or TB III and clamps. My suggestion of doing butt joints and installing the dowels after the door is together would also be a good method, and a very easy one. For a panel, you can use a small profile, like a ¼ round as a stop for both sides.






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