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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made a small table/nightstand out of solid walnut and cherry and coated it with General Finishes polycrylic. I should have realized this from the beginning, but the polycrylic, which dries clear and doesn't leave wood with the somewhat "wet" look, doesn't do much to enhance these woods. :furious:

My question is: Could I sand all surfaces to scuff the coats of polycrylic that are on it and apply a Minwax polyurethane? Would adhesion be ok?

Thanks!;)
 

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Assuming the table hasn't been used you can sand the polycrylic until there is no shine to it anymore and coat it with polyurethane. If the furniture has been uses or handled a great deal it might be a good idea to clean it with alcohol also to get any skin oils or waxes off.
 

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You can lightly sand and then apply an oil base polyurethane. But...don't get your hopes up that it will do magical things. It will add a gloss, just like adding a waterbase gloss to what's there. It will also darken the look slightly.

What does enhance the look of wood initially is an oil, or the oil in an oil base polyurethane. So, you could use an oil first (like BLO) and then topcoat with waterbase polyurethane. Or, use an OB poly and topcoat that with a WB poly.




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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can lightly sand and then apply an oil base polyurethane. But...don't get your hopes up that it will do magical things. It will add a gloss, just like adding a waterbase gloss to what's there. It will also darken the look slightly.

What does enhance the look of wood initially is an oil, or the oil in an oil base polyurethane. So, you could use an oil first (like BLO) and then topcoat with waterbase polyurethane. Or, use an OB poly and topcoat that with a WB poly.




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Good advice, thanks!:thumbsup:
 

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Nice looking table but I'm hoping that the center panel is not solid wood. If it is, seasonal changes in relative humidity will cause the panel to expand and contract across the direction of the grain. This will push the framing pieces causing the joints to open up.
 

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Nice looking table but I'm hoping that the center panel is not solid wood. If it is, seasonal changes in relative humidity will cause the panel to expand and contract across the direction of the grain. This will push the framing pieces causing the joints to open up.
Saying that seasonal changes will cause the panel to expand is not always the case. If the subject remains in a constant environment, it's very unlikely that there will be movement issues.





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