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First of all you should never use two coats of stain. With two coats of stain you are likely to let some of it dry on the surface. Then when you put a finish on it the finish adheres to the stain instead of the wood and later peals off. I suspect your shinny places are just that. I think the dull places are where the finish was able to soak into the wood. More coats would cure that but the rest of it is unknown if the finish would stay or not.
 

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Sorry guys, I meant to say 2 Coats of Polyurethane, not stain. My apologies
OK, the one coat of stain you applied, did you wipe off the excess? If you applied it like paint and let it dry it could cause the same problem. If you did wipe off the excess you are alright, you just have a soft spot in the wood that absorbed the finish instead of building. More coats will fix it. I would be inclined to just add finish on the dull spots until it catches up and then scuff sand it and apply a coat over all of it.
 

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Yep, I wiped everything off after 1 minute and worked in sections when I stained it. I'll apply some more Poly to the dull spots until the sheen comes out the same. Should I sand between the coats till it catches up, or just wait for it to catch up? Will 220 or finer do the trick for the sanding? Then just to make sure that I understand, once everything is uniform, do 1 final coat of poly?
Good, it's always a good practice to wipe off the excess stain. With polyurethane the finish needs the scratches created by sanding for it to bond well. Poly isn't known for great adhesion so it can use all the help it can get.
 
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