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Does anybody else feel compelled to point out their mistakes in a project? I can't seem to break the habit. Sometimes I make a mistake on a project, manage to successfully cover it up so it will never be seen, even make it look like it was done on purpose at times, and then when showing the piece I'll inevitably point it out and tell how it happened. I think I must have an inward fear that the mistake will be discovered later, and then someone will think I was trying to pass my work off as better than it is.
 

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where's my table saw?
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this is an easy one...

Always tell the truth, just don't always be telling it.... :blink:
 

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crosseyed & dyslexic
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I'll show my wife, if she doesn't pick up on it first. Other than that I keep my mouth shut.

This reminds me of a article on Japanese joinery I once read. If an apprentice makes an error, no matter how small and even if it could be fixed, the master makes him/her leave the mistake to remind them of where they are in their journey towards perfection.
Quite different on how we approach many things, we're taught to make it right, cover it up or even alter the design all in the vain attempt to give the appearance of perfection.
I know I'm guilty, but I keep that idea in the back of my mind and at times I even embrace that philosophy.
 

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Mistakes happen. They happen a lot sometimes. A true craftsman is one who can take a mistake, and make it look like it was the original intent.

I always classify mistakes as "good mistakes" or "bad mistakes"

Cutting a board to 33" when it was suppose to be 32" is a good mistake, 31" would be a bad mistake.

Just recently I was putting hinge plates on a face frame. Without thinking I put them on without flipping the faceframe over. I drilled the hinge plate holes on the front of the Cherry face frame. Arggg. Of course it was the more complex biggest of all the cherry face frames.

1st thought was I had to remake the FF over. But I thought about it and ended up removing the end stile and the mid stile and replaced them. Redrilled the holes on the backside where they belonged.

So instead of this being a bad mistake it was a good mistake.
 

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Cedar Box Maker
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I agree "Always tell the truth" but let's think out side the box.
Did the person your showing this to make the mistake? NO:eek:
Does the person your showing this to know very much about woodworking? NO:blink: :zorro:
Does the person your showing this to care more about the mistake than he/she cares about you? NO :no:
Does the person your showing this to, ever make mistakes? Yes :yes:
So why are you telling everything you know about your mistake? Hummmm! :thumbsup::icon_smile:
"Always Tell The Truth" If your asked.:laughing::laughing::thumbup::laughing::laughing:
 

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Sometimes a mistake makes you think of solution that makes project better. Why not share- nobodies perfect and your mistake and confession of it might help another- what is wrong with that??
When I was making this box lid I cut the miters on top short. I thought I was going to have to trash the beautiful curly walnut. Then a light came on- at my age they are always dim lights :laughing::laughing:- I used a board stretcher- strips of ebony. Now it looks like I planned it but I get more reward passing the save on rather then being perfect.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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One other thing, my wife never has to tell me about her "mistakes" I have to eat her cooking.


LOL!

My wife doesn't cook any more, so I don't have to eat here mistakes.

HOWEVER

She is very good at pointing out my mistakes.
 

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Like most - I make mistakes, but unlike most, I embrace my mistakes...

As stated, your mistakes can help you and others learn. Talk about them.

Perfection is machine made... to err is human! My mistakes always prove that what I'm showing was made by me! And like previously stated, most folks don't see your mistakes. Even after pointing to the mistakes. most folks will still only see your completed project...

Have fun everyone
 

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I share my mistakes and solutions with other woodworkers.

I appreciate it when they do the same.

Its part of my learning experience.
 
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When I show a project to someone, I too point out the mistakes, usually they can't tell. But everytime I look at it, I pick it apart.

Like you can just see that curve is off or that glue joint has a little gap or that piece Of wood is as plain as it gets.
 

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I had clients over at my place to look at some finished work and place a few orders.

I had a cherry coffee table out for show, it was my first coffee table I'd built. Its a really lovely piece, clean, simple. But it was my first ad it was riddled with mistakes which are near impossible to see.

So, they asked me if was for sale. I said "no, that one had too many mistakes. I can't believe I kept it and didn't cut it up to reuse the parts." They just looked at me like I was crazy.

"Where are the mistakes?" "You can't see them?" "No, really, we can't see them." So I pointed them out and they still couldn't see them.

We are the makers. We are intimately aware of every inch of every piece we make. Our clients understand that our attention to detail is what separates us from what can be bought in stores an there is a bit leniency granted to us for a few small, tiny things. They don't even see a lot of what we agonize over.

We have to separate ourselves to some degree and know when something is "done". For me, I step away and ask "could I live with it". If the answer is "yes" then the piece is as good as it will be and my client will be happy.
 

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This discussion I think reflects on all the artists and craftsmen that genuinely care about what they do. Generally we are our own worst critics.
I know that most of my work has an error or two (at least) and explain them when asked--adds character to the piece, and complement the buyer/critic on their "eye", more often than not- results in a sale or a new friend.
Dave H
 

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I never make mistakes.

I thought I did once, but I was wrong.:laughing:
 

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I make stuff for my sister's chapter of relay for life charity. I don't have to tell them about the mistakes... My sister always seems to find them.... Why is that crooked what's it that way for? Why are the holes not in a line.. breathe in breathe out I tell myself! LOL
 

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Tell her because it's free. Actually it probably costs you money because of the material.

Ask her to make a donation to the wood fund and maybe some of the holes will line up better :laughing:
 

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Tell her because it's free. Actually it probably costs you money because of the material.

Ask her to make a donation to the wood fund and maybe some of the holes will line up better :laughing:

That's where she's got me... She buys the wood and material and I just donate my time. :eek:
 

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I guess you need to do better work then.....:smile:
 
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