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Aside from using those really thin (hardwood?) edges :)

So what can I do to make it really look like a solid piece of wood?
 

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I make my own banding from the same hardwood that I use for the face frames. Just rip with a good blade (I usually use Woodworker II) and make the strips 1/16". The 3/4" hardwood is slightly thicker than the plywood, so it leaves just enough over each edge to trim with a flush trim router bit.
Use cauls to glue it so it gets even pressure.
 

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i've used both edge banding and strips cut from solid wood. some of the strips from solid wood, i've purposefully cut them a 1/4" wider than the plywood, dado the length of it about a 1/4' deep centered, rolled over the edges, then glued it on the length of the plywood edge. worked well for that project.
 

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I've used the iron on edge banding and solid wood of different thicknesses. For drawer parts, using plywood, I rip the height of the drawer sides short of the thickness of the banding in 8' lengths. Then glue it all up. When dry, trim and sand. Then those pieces are cut to size and machined with whatever jointing I plan to use.

If it's a ply other than BB, or Apple ply, I also may add edging to the ends of the parts for visible joinery, like DT's.

I don't use mating bits that profile the plywood to accept wood edging. Wood edging glues up fine with just clamping, like for dividers, slab doors, and leading edges for frameless carcasses. No sense with overkill, and possibly having a goof up doing the machining.






 

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I use hardwood edging. Usually find some that has matching grain, then it is harder to tell difference between ply and solid.
 

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Cabinetman, & Woodman42, I have historically used the exact same techniques, ( with exception of iron on, tried it a couple of times years ago & wasn't happy with results ). What prompted me to try these bits was a customer specifying a slab door with a wide detailed edge profile, and no end grain showing. I felt regular self-edging would not have handled the stress of the euro hinges with the weight of the doors. I thought of biscuits, dowels or splines, but am always looking for a good excuse to buy & try new tools! Sometimes meeting the client's demands at the expense of stepping out of my comfort zone is a good thing.
......all the way
 

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woodman51jfk

Just plain glue and clamps provides plenty of strength. Adding an internal profile to create a glue joint doesn't really add much surface area. It may, OTOH create weak edges.

As an example, I've made raised panels, using plywood for the "field", and wood edging, wide enough to use shaper profiles. This provides for a "no movement" issue for a raised panel, and long grain instead of end grain on the ends of the panel. Never had a problem with the edge. Likewise, made doors possibly like you're doing, with plywood and a wide wood edge, that carried the whole cup mortise, and then some. It was also for a wide detail on the face.

I hear the descriptions that some on forums describe on their extensive machining of some glue joint, biscuit, or pocket screw mounting for FF's to carcasses. If the back of the FF and the leading edge of the carcass are flat, glue and clamps works well. BTW, most all my cabinets are frameless, unless a FF is called for to match existing work, or needed for a design detail.






 

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I cut a v notch into the edge of the plywood and glue in a v shaped section of the appropriate wood. Sand until flush with veneer and it makes it very hard to tell it is not a solid board. One of the magazines did an article on it 6 months back or so.
 

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.........never considered using only glue & clamping when using plywood...might give it a shot......adhesives have progressed quite a bit & I should take advantage of that........I like the frozen panel idea, too.
Quite the opposite, the majority of my work is face framed, the exceptions being melamine boxes specified in some commercial applications....hospitals, hotels & doctors/dentists offices...hate working with the stuff, but ain't rich enough to turn the work away:no:

woodman51jfk

Just plain glue and clamps provides plenty of strength. Adding an internal profile to create a glue joint doesn't really add much surface area. It may, OTOH create weak edges.

As an example, I've made raised panels, using plywood for the "field", and wood edging, wide enough to use shaper profiles. This provides for a "no movement" issue for a raised panel, and long grain instead of end grain on the ends of the panel. Never had a problem with the edge. Likewise, made doors possibly like you're doing, with plywood and a wide wood edge, that carried the whole cup mortise, and then some. It was also for a wide detail on the face.

I hear the descriptions that some on forums describe on their extensive machining of some glue joint, biscuit, or pocket screw mounting for FF's to carcasses. If the back of the FF and the leading edge of the carcass are flat, glue and clamps works well. BTW, most all my cabinets are frameless, unless a FF is called for to match existing work, or needed for a design detail.






 

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Pianoman
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I like the matched router bits, but I don`t like hand routing ply. You can`t depend on the edge... too many voids...unless filled and prept. Don`t see a problem just gluing and clamping shelf build-ups. I`ve built many cabinet layouts (paint grade that is) with just a stanley knife, barrel grip bosch and a block plane. Shoot the 1by2 on after gluing... fill just the nail holes and sand before it`s dry. Old school... but very effitient. Rick
 

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Using a router

Pianoman

I used a router and noticed a lot of voids. So yeah i was doing as you stated with the wood filler boy this is time consuming.


Im brand new at routering, any suggestions?
 
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