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Hi all,
I'm about to start a new project, a bunk bed for one of the kiddos, this weekend and have ran into a small problem. I designed the front and back rails to have mortise and tenon joint. I was planning on using the new craftsman router I purchased last year. Unfortunately, it's a fixed based router, here is a link. I've searched around and can't find a plunge base for this model. :thumbdown: First question, does anyone know if there is a plunge base for this model?

If not, what is the best bang for the buck? I need to pick something up local as I need to get started on this project. The primary purpose will be to make mortises.

I've also thought about the old fashion hammer and chisel method. But, with about 24 joints thats a lot of manual labor.
 

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I cannot help with "best bang for the buck". I like the Bosch routers, but they may not be the cheapest.

You can use the present fixed base router.
a) Use a plunge cut to start. Tilt the router so the bit is not contacting the wood. Start the router and slowly tilt into the wood. Need supports on either side of the base so the router does not move while being tilted.
b) Drill a starter hole. You can then lower the router into the hole and then turn on.
 

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John
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3,028 Posts
Hi all,
I'm about to start a new project, a bunk bed for one of the kiddos, this weekend and have ran into a small problem. I designed the front and back rails to have mortise and tenon joint. I was planning on using the new craftsman router I purchased last year. Unfortunately, it's a fixed based router, here is a link. I've searched around and can't find a plunge base for this model. :thumbdown: First question, does anyone know if there is a plunge base for this model?

If not, what is the best bang for the buck? I need to pick something up local as I need to get started on this project. The primary purpose will be to make mortises.

I've also thought about the old fashion hammer and chisel method. But, with about 24 joints thats a lot of manual labor.
http://www.sears.com/craftsman-10.0...p-00927666000P?prdNo=4&blockNo=4&blockType=G4

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00927683000P

The first link may be what you want, about the same power as the one you have in a plunge base trim.
I have the one in the second link and like it a lot.
Since the router you have was sold as part of a package deal (router + table), I doubt there will be a plunge base offered anywhere.
Good Luck:smile:
 

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Craftsman routers are made by a variety of other manufacturers. I think that model was made by PC, but not 100% sure. You may want to compare them. It is possible You can find a plunge base to match. Craftsman routers have been made by PC, Bosch, Black & Decker, Ryobi, and who knows who else.
 

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John
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Craftsman routers are made by a variety of other manufacturers. I think that model was made by PC, but not 100% sure. You may want to compare them. It is possible You can find a plunge base to match. Craftsman routers have been made by PC, Bosch, Black & Decker, Ryobi, and who knows who else.
Those Craftsman routers have a mfg code of 120.***X which, I believe is Chervon, a Chinese company that also makes Husky and several other brands marketed around the big boxes. I doubt any of the Porter Cable bases will fit. The motor on my Craftsman router is significantly different than the one on my friends 690. That, and a new Porter Cable plunge base only is running slightly over $100, substantially more than the 10 amp Craftsman plunge. :smile:
 
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