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He guys newbie:

I have a cleaning lady that put pledge on a table top and placed books back after cleaning. The lettering on book left markings on the table. Do you have any tricks to removing these markings.

Would mineral spirits and 4000 grit automotive sanding pad take it off?

Thanks for any suggestions?

Please email me.

Sgray002
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>>>> I do not understand how pledge and a book could have had that result.

Pledge contains oils and thinners that remain on the surface. Those will react with inks used in printing and transferring can occur.
 

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Fast fix is a dab of automotive polish rubbed with a cotton cloth, then clean again with pledge.
 

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I can see if the pledge was left wet could have liquefied the binding on a book. Anyway you might just soak the spot with more pledge and see if it loosens it up. You might let it soak for 10 to 15 minutes and use some 0000 steel wool. Rubbing compound could maybe work however you run the risk of making the finish shiny on that spot.
 

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>>>> I do not understand how pledge and a book could have had that result.

Pledge contains oils and thinners that remain on the surface. Those will react with inks used in printing and transferring can occur.
I would not have expected that someone would have used pledge and immediately lay down a book while the surface was still wet.

If the pledge has dried my question remains.

George
 

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Most supermarket "furniture" polishes contain non-drying oils. These oils are not fully wiped off in the "polishing" process. The most common non-drying oil is mineral oil followed by silicone. Because a slight film leaves a sheen to the surface the user thinks the surface is polished. The slight film left on the surface, in addition to creating the look of a polish, also attracts and holds dust that lands on the surface. Guess what? the build up of dust causes you to need to polish again which is a way for the "furniture polish" manufacturer to generate future sales.
 

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Most supermarket "furniture" polishes contain non-drying oils. These oils are not fully wiped off in the "polishing" process. The most common non-drying oil is mineral oil followed by silicone. Because a slight film leaves a sheen to the surface the user thinks the surface is polished. The slight film left on the surface, in addition to creating the look of a polish, also attracts and holds dust that lands on the surface. Guess what? the build up of dust causes you to need to polish again which is a way for the "furniture polish" manufacturer to generate future sales.
If that is what you are talking about, then you need to purchase a better quality of oil or get a better maid.

George
 
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