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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought the rigid tablesaw about a month ago and I really like it, but I have one problem that I don't know if it can be fixed or if it is normal.

I have lined up the fence according to instructions, adjusted the blade to be square with the miter slots and everything else the instructions suggested. The problem is that if I move the fence to say 10" the outfeed side of the fence could be anywhere from 9 7/8" to 10 1/8". Basically it has about 1/4" of play from the infeed side of the table.

Once you lock the fence down it remains fixed and doesn't move but the outfeed side will be fixed to wherever it was before locking the fence. Is this normal? I was hoping that with a T style fence it would automatically square up the fence when you locked it down, am I wrong or do I need to tighten or loosen the bolt on the outfeed side?
 

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Not normal. The fence should move equally from front to back. There should be instructions in your manual as to how to adjust the fence.

That said, it would not matter the way I use a fence. I never trust that movement to be equal and measure front and back each time I move the fence. Extra work, but I Want to be sure the back of the fence is never closer to the blade then the front of the fence. Of course, I am only a hobbyist and do not use the saw that much so the way I do it is no problem. For someone who used the saw every day it would be unacceptable.

George
 

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Not sure I follow what's happening but a trick to the Ridgid fences is to push forward on the fence all the way and then clamp down. This helps the self-aligning nature of the design. I was going to upgrade my fence but after getting this down, I'm more than happy with it's performance.
 

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Not sure I follow what's happening but a trick to the Ridgid fences is to push forward on the fence all the way and then clamp down. This helps the self-aligning nature of the design. I was going to upgrade my fence but after getting this down, I'm more than happy with it's performance.
it's amazing that so many users ignore this step. it's also important that the spreader bar be installed so that the rails don't flex inward when the fence is engaged. this can cause the fence to misalign in use. the old gray ridgids used to provide thin copper washers for fine tuning the fitting of spreader bars. i just checked the 4512 OM and such items seem to be absent from the list of materials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not sure I follow what's happening but a trick to the Ridgid fences is to push forward on the fence all the way and then clamp down. This helps the self-aligning nature of the design. I was going to upgrade my fence but after getting this down, I'm more than happy with it's performance.
Tried this really quick over lunch and it seemed to line the fence up. I will take some measurements later but this seems to be the solution to my problem: i.e. I'm a noob
 
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