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Hey folks,

I am looking at 2 different planer molders. The RBI 3 in 1 planer molder vs the Grizzly 15" model. I had some questions for verteran woodworkers:

The Grizzly costs less at $799 has 2HP will do up to 15" board.
The RBI is $1995, has a 5HP motor. Both have feed rollers. For a newbie just getting into woodworking (hobbie only), is the 2HP grizzly good enough or will I need the extra power for hardwoos light oak & maple ? Thanks

Joe
 

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Joe,

if you can spare the dough, skip both of them and opt for a Woodmaster 25". It is a better machine than the RBI and they make their own carbide spiral cutters similiar to the Byrd angled inserts. It too has a 5HP motor with 3 phase option.

If you cannot get the Woodmaster, I would go with the RBI if you are concerned about profiling, gang sawing, and sanding etc. plus 5HP is significantly better than the 2HP.

BUT . . . if you know for a fact you just want to plane boards within the 15" range then I would go for the Grizzly and spend the savings on a spiral head cutter. You won't need more than 2HP with it. Grizzly sells them for many of their planers.
 

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I believe that given enough time

I could convince you to stear away from the planer/moulder combination and get a dedicated planer. Especially since I truly believe that you will never be able to justify making your own molding on a cost plus basis. Spend your money wisely and spring for a real 15" planer like the Grizzly Model #G0453. I have the model that preceded the current offering and it is a work horse. The Grizzly planer/moulder you are looking appears to be modeled after the craftsman planer and planer/moulder. I also have the craftsmanat planer and use it for my on site work. Not my steady cabinet, door etc money making adventures.

Ed
 

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. . . Especially since I truly believe that you will never be able to justify making your own molding on a cost plus basis. . . .

I keep forgetting that not everyone owns their own sawmill. Ed is right don't buy the moulder to save money, however alot of the people who buy a moulder do so because they want to grind their own kinves for custom moulding that is simply not avaialble. To someone in the historic restoration business the need for a moulder is paramount.

there are actually many reasons to own a moulder, but going into the moulding business unless you own your own timber and mill and dry kiln is probably not one of them.
 
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